Who We Are

Faculty

Professors in the English department explore a wide variety of research and creative interests outside of teaching, from medieval manuscripts and animals in Victorian literature to experimental poetry and the ethics of soccer. Learn all about us below.


Matt Kavanagh 2012

Matt Kavanagh, Department Chair (Kelowna)

Matt joined the Department of English in September 2007 and just began a stint as Chair. He's taught previously at McGill University in Montreal and McMaster University in Hamilton where he lectured on subjects ranging from literature to cultural studies to film and back again. His interests are broad, but if you corner him, he'll admit to a passion for contemporary fiction (British and American), psychoanalytic theory, and literary journalism.

Matt holds a Ph.D. in English from McGill, where his research focused on representations of the market in recent American fiction by Don DeLillo, Jonathan Franzen, Bret Easton Ellis, Jack Womack and others. Matt is intrigued by the intersection of economics and literature and is particularly interested in the critique of financial reason offered by thinkers like Mark C. Taylor, Randy Martin, Fredric Jameson and Slavoj Žižek. His current research investigates fictional representations of that strange confluence of information technology and financial speculation known as cybercapital. He is working on a project that reads Don DeLillo’s career against the backdrop of ascendant neoliberalism.

Credentials:

Ph.D. (McGill), MA, BA (McMaster)

Recent Projects:

I contributed a chapter to the first scholarly collection of essays on the work of American novelist Michael Chabon (Rowman & Littlefield). I also have a chapter in an edited collection that examines the recent work of Don DeLillo (forthcoming from Rowman & Littlefield).

With the support of the College, I’ve travelled to the Harry Ransom Center for the Humanities at the University of Texas to examine DeLillo’s papers. I presented on some of this archival research in February at “Fiction Rescues History,” a conference for DeLillo scholars held in Paris. My findings include stumbling across a previously unknown film treatment of the material that would become DeLillo’s award-winning novel Libra.

Recently Read:

Paul Beatty’s The Sellout and Yaa Gyasi’s Homegoing

What Students May Not Know:

I have a deep and abiding passion for the Toronto Maple Leafs. I know, I know...

Why I Teach:

To carry on conversation...

Jeremy Beaulne

Red Dot Players
KIdsWWwrite

Jeremy Beaulne (Penticton)

Jeremy grew up in the village of Pouce Coupe in northern British Columbia. After graduating from high school, he moved to Vancouver to study English literature at the University of British Columbia. Upon completing his MA thesis, an exploration of aesthetics and nationalism in Laurence Sterne's novel Tristram Shandy. Jeremy returned to the North, where he taught English, theatre, and film at the Dawson Creek and Fort St. John campuses of Northern Lights College for eight years. He has been a member of the Okanagan College English Department since Fall 2008.

When he is not teaching, Jeremy is active in amateur theatre. He has acted in numerous productions, including a one-man show called Tales of a Catskinner, which toured several communities in northern British Columbia. In addition, Jeremy has directed productions of Krapp's Last Tape, The Importance of Being Earnest, Blood Relations, The Reluctant Resurrection of Sherlock Holmes, Between Yourself and Me, Arsenic and Old Lace, Dracula, The Beaux' Stratagem, Blithe Spirit, Les Belles-Soeurs, The Government Inspector, Sense and Sensibility, and Neverwhere.

Jeremy has also written two plays: A.K.A. Fangirl, a comedy about cosplay and comic books, and Special Guest, a satire of espionage films. The former was awarded “Best Full-Length Play” in Theatre BC’s 2014 Playwriting Competition.

Credentials:

MA (University of British Columbia), BA (University of British Columbia)

Recent Projects:

Jeremy's most recent projects include directing Neverwhere for the Red Dot Players, helping to organize the second Demystifying Community Theatre event at the Rotary Centre for the Arts, and writing sketches for a Kelowna-based comedy television series called Actors Saying Words. He is also doing research for a play about Mary Toft, a young Englishwoman who convinced several prominent figures in the eighteenth-century medical community that she was giving birth to rabbits.

Recently Read:

The Relic Master by Christopher Buckley; various scripts for the next Red Dot Players production

What Students May Not Know:

Jeremy was the editorial cartoonist at The Ubyssey, UBC's student newspaper, for two years.

Why I Teach:

I love how teaching literature exposes me to fresh perspectives on texts I've worked with for years.

Norah Bowman-Broz

Norah Bowman (Kelowna and Penticton)

In 2014 I received my PhD from the University of Alberta in the English and Film Studies department. My dissertation is a study of BC settler literature in relation to climate change, the mountain pine beetle, and bioregionalism.

My next project might be about resistance literature. I'm collecting stories about resistance and creation in times of oppression; nothing like a Get Up Stand Up to rouse my academic torpor.

Credentials:

PhD, English and Film Studies, (University of Alberta), MA, English Literature, (University of Manitoba), BA Honours, English, (Okanagan University College)

Recent Projects:

Amplify! A Graphic Text of Feminist Resistance, co-authored with writer Meg Braem and artist Dominique Hui, University of Toronto Press, 2018; "Here/There/Everywhere: Quantum Models for Decolonizing Canadian State Onto-Epistemology," Foundations of Science, forthcoming, 2018.

Recently Read:

Woman Awake: Women Practicing Buddhism, Christine Feldman; Okanagan Geology: British Columbia, Murray A. Roed and John D. Greenough; Unsettling Canada: A National Wake-Up Call, Arthur Manuel and Grand Chief Ronald M. Derrickson

What Students May Not Know:

I'm a dog person.

Why I Teach:

I teach to learn.

Hannah Calder

Hannah Calder (Vernon and Salmon Arm)

Hannah Calder was born in Canterbury, England, and spent the first 15 years of her life living with her large family (including 50 chickens and two ponies) in Kent. At 15, her parents decided to move the family to Vernon, B.C., which she eventually realized was far from the greatest tragedy of her life.

At 19, Hannah enrolled in classes at Capilano College. It was there that she began to connect with writers and to share, publish and publicly read her poetry. Hannah went on to complete her B.A. in English at Simon Fraser University, writing her honours paper on Angela Carter’s The Bloody Chamber. After graduating, Hannah spent time in Chicago working as a nanny, in Kent working as a residential social worker and in Seoul teaching ESL. She then returned to SFU to complete her M.A. in English, graduating with distinction in 2004. By the end of her M.A., Hannah’s interests had shifted from Modernism and Postmodernism to pretty much anything written by men in tights. Thinking back on the courses she took as an M.A. student, she believes that the eclectic mix of radically experimental contemporary writing with the writing of “old dudes” (such as Spenser, Milton, and Shakespeare), continues to inform both her writing and teaching. She hopes to introduce students to a range of literary periods and writing styles in both her Creative Writing and Literature classes.

Hannah’s interest in literature always has and always will lead back to her own desire to write. She reads to write and is infinitely fascinated by why writers write what they do and how they do it so well. During her M.A., she wrote the first draft of her novel, More House, which she went on to publish in 2009 with New Star books. In May, 2016, she published her second novel, Piranesi’s Figures, again with New Star books.

Hannah’s art making, photography, and writing have also opened pathways for her to explore exciting opportunities in filmmaking, Film Studies, and writing for the screen. She’s looking forward to sharing her knowledge and experience with students.

Hannah began teaching at Okanagan College in 2012.

Credentials:

MA, BA (Simon Fraser University)

Recent Projects:

A book of short stories entitled Those Lights of Zoology and a documentary film entitled Why We Write: Poets of Vernon, in collaboration with The Orange Lamphouse Studio in Vancouver.

Recently Read:

The Sea around Us (Rachel Carson); The Arab of the Future: A Childhood in the Middle East 1878-1984 (Riad Sattouf); Cyclogeography: Journeys of a London Bicycle Courier (Jon Day); Hammertown (Peter Culley).

What Students May Not Know:

I live in a bilingual household.

Why I Teach:

To share my passion for the written word with others.

Corinna Chong

Ryga: A Journal of Provocations
Corinna's website

Corinna Chong (Kelowna and Vernon)

Corinna Chong studied both Fine Arts and English at the University of Calgary, and specialized in photography and creative writing. She worked as a graphic designer, backpacked around India, China, and Nepal, and earned her Master’s degree in English and Creative Writing at the University of New Brunswick before finally landing in the Okanagan in 2011. Her first novel, Belinda’s Rings, was published by NeWest Press in 2013. When she’s not teaching, Corinna is working on freelance design projects and chipping away at short stories. Corinna is always seeking bridges between the visual and literary arts, and has lately been cultivating a love of graphic novels and artist’s books.

Credentials:

MA (University of New Brunswick), BFA, BA (University of Calgary)

Recent Projects:

“Wolf-Boy Saturday,” a short story, was published in The Humber Literary Review, and "Thieves," a piece of creative non-fiction, was published in Cosmonauts Avenue. I am also working on a novel set in Drumheller called Bad Land.

Recently Read:

Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado; The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore by Kim Fu; Into the Woods: A Five-Act Journey Into Story by John Yorke

What Students May Not Know:

I am hopelessly addicted to ice cream.

Why I Teach:

For the love of learning. For the chance to inspire a love of learning in others. For the sake of fostering creativity, curiousity, self-confidence, and an appreciation for diverse perspectives.

Jason Dewinetz 2014

"The Bunker" @ KP
Fine Press Book Association

Jason Dewinetz (Kelowna and Vernon)

Jason grew up in Vernon, graduated from W.L. Seaton, and began his college studies at OC in 1989. Between 1999 & 2005 he returned to Vernon during the summer months to produce the Greenboathouse Reading Series, and in 2007 he came back for good.

Also in 1999, Jason founded Greenboathouse Books, a small press publishing limited edition books of poetry and typographic reference, an endeavour that has continued to gain momentum and attention across the country and internationally. His interest in the formal presentation of writing led him to the design of books, with special interest in typographic principle and history. Greenboathouse Press has garnered more than a dozen national book design awards, and in 2008 Jason served as one of three judges for the Alcuin Society's Annual Awards for Excellence in Book Design in Canada. He is a past North American Chair and current board member of the Fine Press Book Association, and runs "The Bunker," Okanagan College's letterpress print shop.

His poetry has been published in journals across Canada, and he is the author of The Gift of a Good Knife (Outlaw editions, 2000), In Theory (Above/ground press, 2002), Moving to the Clear, (NeWest, 2002), and Clench (Gaspereau Press, 2011). He also co-authored (with Michael O'Driscoll) A Bibliography of the Black Sparrow Press Archive (University of Alberta Press, 2003).

Credentials:

MA (University of Alberta), BA (Honours, University of Victoria)

Recent Projects:

Setting a lot of type to print two new Greenboathouse Press projects

Recently Read:

Everything I could find on Anges Martin, as well as Gaspereau Press’s new book of Carl Dair’s correspondence relating to his typeface Cartier.

What Students May Not Know:

That I went to OC as a student way back in the late 80s and somehow ended up back here as an instructor.

Why I Teach:

To challenge and experiment and explore.

Kerry Gilbert 2018

Kerry's website

Kerry Gilbert (Vernon)

Kerry was born in Calgary, Alberta, and raised in Vernon, British Columbia. She started her university career at Okanagan University College. She finished her Bachelor of Arts at Malaspina University College, in Nanaimo, with a major in Creative Writing and a minor in Liberal Studies. Kerry then took her Master's in Creative Writing at Griffith University, in Australia.

Kerry started teaching Creative Writing and Literature Courses at Okanagan University College in January 2003. She published her first book of poetry, (kerplnk): a verse novel of development in 2005. Her second book of poetry, Tight Wire, was published in 2016 with Mother Tongue Publishing, and was longlisted for the 2017-2018 ReLit Award. Kerry won the Gwendolyn MacEwen Poetry Award for Best Suite by an Emerging Writer 2016/2017 and three of her poems were longlisted for the 2017-2018 Ralph Gustafson Prize for Best Poem. Kerry is currently on the long list for the 2018-2019 Gwendolyn MacEwan Poetry Award for Best Suite. Her next book of poetry, Little Red, is coming out with Mother Tongue in April 2019.

Kerry continues to live in Vernon, with her husband and three kids. She believes in the unique opportunities for students of Okanagan College, and is happy to be a part of such a dynamic, creative English Department.

Credentials:

MA (Griffith University), BA (Okanagan University College, Malaspina University College)

Recent Projects:

I am currently doing the final edits of Little Red and am working on a new poetry manuscript.

Recently Read:

The Marrow Thieves, by Cherie Dimaline and Calling A Wolf A Wolf, by Kaveh Akbar

What Students May Not Know:

I did my first two years of university at OUC's Vernon campus.

Why I Teach:

I love the process of teaching, because I love what it means to learn.

FrancieGreenslade

Francie's website

Francie Greenslade (Penticton)

Teaching is not "merely to confirm the status quo [but] to challenge ourselves so that we may become critical participants in our educational process and society as a whole."
— Carl E. James

I've written stories since I could write. After several unsuccessful attempts to make what I thought would be a more practical choice, I chose to study English literature at University of Winnipeg. It has proven to be a very practical choice for me, a field that has allowed me to do what I love – read and write, and think about writing.

I completed my Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing at University of British Columbia. I've written for TV Guide, trade magazines, non-profit organizations, and government. Penguin, Canada published my first book, A Pilgrim in Ireland: A Quest for Home, in 2002. My second book, By the Secret Ladder: A Mother's Initiation was published by Penguin in May 2007. Shelter, a novel, was published by Random House in August, 2011 and in the US, UK and Australia, Germany and the Netherlands (in translation) in 2012. An Italian translation was published in 2015 and a French translation is due soon.

Credentials:

MFA (University of British Columbia), BA (University of Winnipeg).

Recent Projects:

I edited an anthology of fiction, poetry and scholarly writing called Absent Mothers, published by Demeter Press. While on extended study leave, I wrote a novel called Red Fox Road about a twelve-year-old girl who finds herself stranded alone on a road in the Oregon wilderness.

Recently Read:

Bleak House by Charles Dickens; Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls; Bellevue Square by Michael Redhill

What Students May Not Know:

I'm learning to rock climb and have a pretty good repertoire of knots for various purposes, if you ever need a knot.

Why I Teach:

Where else but in a classroom do you get to hear thirty people get so intense, funny, sincere, pissed off, and sweaty about a book?

Shona Harrison 2013

TEAMS Middle English Texts
Children's Literature Resources

Shona R. Harrison (Kelowna)

Shona holds a Ph.D. in English from UBC, where her research focused on the the social, cultural and gender dynamics of the medieval household manuscript within the context of the household as a community of readers, consumers, writers and patrons. This addresses important issues relating to the uses of literacy in the household and family, to power and gender relations, and the construction of social, familial and gender identities. While she is passionate about literatures, Shona is also enamoured with medieval manuscripts; to that end, she completed specialist instruction in medieval manuscript codicology and palaeography while living and studying in England.

Shona started teaching for the Department of English in January 2010. She previously lectured at Vancouver Island University (Duncan and Nanaimo) and University of British Columbia (Kelowna). Shona has taught courses on Composition, Short Fiction and the Novel, Poetry and Drama, Medieval Romance, Literatures on Corporeality, Mother Daughter Literature, and Children's Literature.

Credentials:

PhD (University of British Columbia), MA, BA (University of Victoria).

Recent Projects:

Complete conservation of a 106 year old heritage house; conferencing and writing an article on medieval romance, Sir Eglamour of Aritois.

Recently Read:

Toni Morrison, God Help the Child and Maggie de Vries, Missing Sarah: A Memoir of Loss.

What Students May Not Know:

I am an avid equestrian and own two boisterous beagles, Plato and Winston.

Why I Teach:

"He who opens a school door, closes a prison." –Victor Hugo

 

Maryann Tjart Jantzen (Distance Ed. Tutor)

Maryann has fifteen years of university teaching experience, primarily at the first year level, include several semesters of tutoring for Simon Fraser University Distance Education. She has also served for six years as co-director of the Trinity Western University Writing Centre.

Maryann acted as associate editor (with Elsie Neufeld, et a) of Half in the Shadows: Anthology of British Columbia Mennonite Writing. (Vancouver, BC: Ronsdale Press, 2006) and she is co-editor (with H. Neufeldt and R. Martens) of a volume of biographical essays focussing on the lives of early Fraser Valley Mennonite settlers, Windows to a Village: Life Studies of Yarrow Pioneers (Waterloo: Pandora Press, in press Spring 2007).

SashaJohnston

Sasha Johnston (Kelowna)

I tried to convince one of my classes to write this bio for me, but they refused, so here we go (in point form)....

  • I grew up somewhere/time between Vernon and Calgary.
  • I am a historically minded literary person with a BA in History and a MA in Interdisciplinary Studies, which is more or less a MA in English/Cultural Studies.
  • I feel fairly fanatical about many ideas and issues. I try to use this fanaticism to create an engaging pedagogical experience. I like to use the term fanaticism as a synonym for 'passion' or 'zeal.'

Credentials:

MA (UBC), BA (Mount Royal)

Recent Projects:

I am currently working on two projects: the first is an examination of the many ways in which dominant parenting discourses continue to invoke obvious gendered stereotypes, effectively reinforcing traditional boundaries around motherhood as an intuitive space. The second concerns how the Canadian state is contending with the contradictions between established and emerging narratives of Canadian history and identity in two contemporary projects: the Canadian Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Canadian Museum for Human Rights. I have yet to figure out how or if these projects are related.

Recently Read:

Sven Lindqvist's 'Exterminate All The Brutes' and Shani Mootoo's Cereus Blooms at Night.

What Students May Not Know:

There was a time in my life that I had the Periodic Table of Elements memorized. And though I own several, I have yet to leave the safety and security of my home in a pair of high heeled shoes.

Why I Teach:

Because it is the ideal way to keep learning!

Sean Johnston 2018

Ryga: A Journal of Provocations
Sean's website

Sean Johnston (Kelowna)

Sean Johnston grew up near Asquith, SK, and worked as a surveyor and labourer across Canada before joining the Okanagan College English Department in 2007. His latest books are the novel Listen All You Bullets and the short fiction collection We Don't Listen to Them.

Credentials:

PhD (University of South Dakota), MA (University of New Brunswick), Bachelor of Journalism (Carleton University).

Recent Projects:

Recently finished a short fiction manuscript called Multiplicanda Ah Um. Working on a sequel to my first novel, called Outside Harris, and a book-length digression on an imaginary life called The Absurd Premise.

Recently Read:

Barley Patch by Gerald Murnane; Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth by Chris Ware; The Nearest Thing to Life by James Wood.

What Students May Not Know:

I had a pretty good assists-per-game average in high school, and was pretty good at drawing contact in the lane. I could have been a better free throw shooter, but I wasn't that bad.

Why I Teach:

I love reading and re-reading literature and talking about it with students who are encountering it for the first time.

Jake Kennedy

bpNichol Award

Jake Kennedy (Kelowna)

Jake Kennedy likes it when four cars come to a four-way stop, at exactly the same time and then, like, there's a calmness. Jake Kennedy sometimes says "Rae, stop doing that" and then Rae says "Doing, stop Rae that." Jake Kennedy can weep and lecture and slumgullion stuff like there's no tomorrow. Jake Kennedy takes the paper airplane that you've folded and he thinks to himself secret saccharine thoughts of joy. That is all.

Credentials:

Fiddy (McMaster), mom (U of Calgary), sheep (York University)

Recent Projects:

I am (still! still!) currently working on an entirely made-up biography of New York poet and architect Madeline Gins entitled "Made Line Sing." I am also (still! still!) collaborating with my dear friend kmaximus mcfairson acough on "Death Valley: A Collaborative Community Novel." Oh, and I am Ed McMahon to KME's Johnny at G'morning Poetry: A Late-Night Talk Show Humour Live Poetry Show Event Show (Vernon, BC!). Lastly, I am working on a kids' book called "Go the Fudge to Sleep" which I think is going to be a HUGE hit. Goodnight.

Recently Read:

Andy Stanton's Mr. Gum newsletters. Kelowna Daily Courier bit about how some folks are calling up Okanagan senior citizens and saying "We are the bank--could we have your money dollars and jewels?" and then the senior citizens think "this must be that new-fangled technology for banking" and so they're all "why of course you can have all of my ancient coins bonds and diamonds" which just drives the children of these unfortunate seniors "mad!" Mary Ruefle's Madness, Rack, & Honey--holy moly that's a dreamy book.

What Students May Not Know:

If a poet falls in a forest no one wants to hear.

Why I Teach:

To have my frozen-sea-self shattered daily and to do my part to keep the beauty of "show and tell" alive...

JeremyLanaway

Jeremy Lanaway (Kelowna and Salmon Arm)

After completing the first two years of his post-secondary education at Okanagan College (then called Okanagan University College), Jeremy went on to complete a few degrees (BA, MFA, BEd) at UBC. His teaching experience ranges from teaching English courses at Okanagan College to teaching English and Creative Writing classes at high schools in Canada and Hong Kong to teaching advanced English grammar to ESL students preparing to enter Canadian post-secondary institutions. He has dabbled in freelance writing, publishing short stories in literary journals and non-fiction features in newspapers and magazines in Canada, the United States, and Hong Kong. He's also worked as a freelance writer / editor for Pearson Longman Asia (in fact, still does), Pearson Longman Canada, and Pearson Longman UK, which has given him an opportunity to author, co-author, and edit more than seventy English Language Teaching textbooks.

Credentials:

MFA, BFA, BEd (UBC)

Recent Projects:

Currently working on a textbook series for Pearson Education Hong Kong.

Recently Read:

Winesburg, Ohio by Sherwood Anderson, The Essential Fictions by Isaac Babel

What Students May Not Know:

I write a hockey column for The American magazine.

Why I Teach:

Because it enables me to introduce students to my life-passions—writing, literature, editing and grammar—and hopefully instill the same keenness in some of them as payback for the tutelage and mentoring that I received as a post-secondary student.

John Lent

Writers' Union of Canada
John Lent Bio

John Lent (Retired, but still writing)

John Lent lives in Vernon, BC, where he has taught Creative Writing and Literature courses for Okanagan College for twenty-six years. The Path to Ardroe (2012) is his eighth book. So It Won't Go Away (2005) is a sequel to his 1996 work of fiction, Monet's Garden, in its third printing. Other books by Lent include The Face In The Garden (1990) and Black Horses, Cobalt Suns (2000).

Lent has read from his work in many cities in Canada, the USA, France and England. He has written scholarly articles on Malcolm Lowry, Thomas De Quincey, Wilfred Watson, Mavis Gallant, Kristiana Gunnars and others, and has always been fascinated by the representation of consciousness as narrative.

He is a founding member of Kalamalka Press, The Kalamalka Institute For Working Writers, and the annual Mackie Lecture and Reading Series at Okanagan College in Vernon. Lent is also a singer/songwriter in the Lent / Fraser / Wall Trio whose CD, Shadow Moon, was released in 2005.

Craig McLuckie (Vernon)

Craig McLuckie is a College Professor in the English Department. Born in Scotland, Craig was raised in South Africa, Canada and Scotland. Craig's commitment to the teaching and learner-centred mandate of Okanagan College is reflected in his scholarly work, especially in the purposely polyphonic and political design of the edited collections: Critical Perspectives on Dennis Brutus, Washington, DC: Three Continents Press, 1995 (with Patrick Colbert), Ken Saro-Wiwa: Writer and Activist, CO: Lynne Rienner, 1999 (with Aubrey McPhail) and Arthur Nortje: Poet and South African, Pretoria: University of South Africa P, 2005 (with Ross Tyner). He has published two monographs, one on Nigerian Literature (1990) and one on Scottish writer, William McIlvanney (Scottish Studies International 29 (Johannes Gutenberg U, 1999). His essays and interviews on South African, Scottish, Nigerian and Canadian literatures have appeared in Ariel (UCalgary), Research in African Literatures (Indiana U), College Literature (West Chester U), English in Africa (Rhodes U), Matatu: Journal for African Culture and Society (Amsterdam), Black American Literature Forum (Indiana State U), Twentieth Century Literature (Hofstra U), Revista Canaria de Estudios Ingleses (Universidad de la Laguna), Journal of the African Literature Association (Drexel U), and in Postcolonial African Writers (Greenwood P), The 1890s: An Encyclopedia of British Literature, Art and Culture (Garland P), Emerging Perspectives on Chinua Achebe (Africa World P), and The Prairies: Lost and Found (St. John's College P). Current editing and academic advising projects for Gale, and Columbia University Press.

Craig joined Okanagan College's English Department in 1988 and has taught first through fourth year classes at Okanagan University College and Okanagan College. Resistant to the shallowness of capitalist models of education, Craig sees ownership of the process as central to a learner's success in education and in life.

An avid motorcyclist, Craig's travelling companion is a dog-eared copy of The Travels of Jose Di.

Recent Projects:

Academic editorial and referee work for College Literature, Research in African Literatures, The Journal of Folklore, as well as Pearson, Macmillan, and Bedford publishers.

Recently Read:

Juno Diaz, The Brief Wondrous life of Oscar Wao; John Burnside, On Henry Miller, and Michel Houellebecq's Submission.

What Students May Not Know:

Change is possible. Principles, rigour, and quality are constants.

Why I Teach:

"What he or she represents and how those ideas are represented to an audience - are always and ought to remain an organic part of an ongoing experience in society: of the poor, the disadvantaged, the voiceless, the unrepresented, the powerless." —Edward Said

"We must improve the shared conditions in which we live, of course, but the essential purpose of that will be in order to inhabit more fully the necessary and unalterable terms of our existence. Take away the avoidable injustices of some lives that we may humanly share in the unavoidable injustice that is in all our lives." —William McIlvanney.

Kevin McPherson 2014

Kevin's website
Our Teeth
Why Poetry Sucks

Kevin McPherson (Kelowna and Vernon)

kevin mcpherson eckhoff does and loves writing vice versa teaching as several question marks? Who aren’t you? His own education? Because nascent traces of the indelible Mary Ellen Holland and indefatigable John Lent? Okanagan feels homeliest? He equals most recently today Forge poetry? Do you like some please literary journals like West Wind Review, Fact*Simile, Rampike and Open Letter? Is he trying his ink at short friction now? Can family be any beautifuller, with new-toddler joy planted/heliotropism in Armstrong, BC? A board of director as Caravan Farm Theatre’s Bill Miner Society at this chance, as well, will you know? Does he enjoy currently, this season, again, to judge the bpNichol chapbook award, smiling? Belief fills kevin’s playdoh with hope trusting language as mutable & meaningful in every its flavours and shapes and sounds? Of course!

Credentials:

MA (U of Calgary), BA (OUC)

Recent Projects:

Check out these poetry hoaxes: I hotwired The Time Machine by HG Wells, throwing its sentences into the everytime... the first installment is soon-soon-now as a chapbook from SPACECRAFT PRESS (2014). This past summer, I performed six improv-texts devised my Moez Surani, which involved shaving my noggin and sitting for 24 hours in Kensington’s Bellevue Park! Please feel free to write my hypothetical death and send to theirbiography@myself.com

Recently Read:

Injun by Jordan Abel & Janey’s Arcadia by Rachael Zolf

What Students May Not Know:

…or may not want to know! Look into my sole: I am not a very good zombie, and I am a worse vegetarian.

Why I Teach:

Sharing and community and empowerment and student loans and home-made and cookies!

Melanie Murray 2011 sized

Melanie's website

Melanie Murray (Retired)

“Fill your paper with the breathings of your heart.” –William Wordsworth

My literary career was launched in high school after I read John Galsworthy’s The Forsyte Saga. I studied at the University of New Brunswick, earning a B.A. in English, a B.Ed., and an M.A. (Canadian Literature). Drawn to the temperate climate and fruitful abundance of the Okanagan Valley, I settled in Kelowna in 1987 and began teaching English at Okanagan College. In 2011, I published my first book, For Your Tomorrow: the Way of an Unlikely Soldier. I feel fortunate to have the best of vocations: reading and discussing great literature while, assisting students to appreciate and express the beauty and power of words.

Credentials:

MA, B.Ed., BA (Honours, University of New Brunswick)

Recent Projects:

My book of creative nonfiction, Should Auld Acquaintance: Discovering the Woman Behind Robert Burns, will be published in January 2017.

Recently Read:

Stranger by David Bergen, The Wonder by Emma Donoghue, Serial Monogamy by Kate Taylo.

What Students May Not Know:

Sutherland Ave. is named after one of Kelowna's first mayors who is also on a branch of my Nova Scotia family tree.

Why I Teach:

Being a teacher allows me to be a perpetual student.

Terry Scarborough 2018

Terry Scarborough (Kelowna)

I have been with Okanagan College’s English Department since September, 2006. While most of my teaching experience involves literature and academic writing, I also have experience teaching English as a Second Language and writing for business and engineers. I have also worked as a consulting editor and have written instructor’s manuals and exam material for Oxford University Press and reviews for other major publishers. While I embrace a wide spectrum of pedagogical approaches, my teaching philosophy is largely based in dialogue.

My research interests involve nineteenth-century British literature, particularly the urban Gothic, Dark Romanticism, vampires, the ghost story, and Dickens studies. My most current project examines Charles Dickens’s early works from the perspective of zoocriticism and the history of sanitary reform. I have presented and published widely in these fields, and continue to expand my work in these and other areas. I am dedicated to furthering my scholarly experience to keep current in my discipline and to improve constantly upon my teaching as well as the overall quality of education in Arts here at OC.

I completed my undergraduate and graduate work at the University of Victoria, where my graduate research focused on Bram Stoker’s Dracula, late nineteenth-century psychology, the Victorian family, and the novel’s epistolary structure. I am a member of the Victorian Popular Fiction Association (University of London, UK) and a lifetime member of the Golden Key International Honour Society. I was also a founding fellow of Okanagan College’s Institute for Learning and Teaching.

Outside of teaching English, I am an avid musician and have played guitar, bass, and drums in multiple Victoria bands. I scored and performed music for the short film kanadien and the local documentary Strange Fruit. After playing for over thirty years, I continue to further my musical experience at most every opportunity. I am also a pretty serious cyclist and, back in the good old days, a surfer. While I still have my surfboard, those sweet swells are a little far from the Okanagan, so that chapter of my life remains in limbo. When I am not reading, writing, teaching or playing music, I am most likely to be found hanging out with my family, or searching for gold in some remote forest with my Siberian husky.

Credentials:

BA, MA (University of Victoria)

Recent Projects:

I am currently under contract to produce a monograph for Edward Everett Root Publishers (UK). The book, which is titled Bite the Hand that Reads: Dickens, Animals and Sanitary Reform, will be available in 2020. During the past few years, I have also presented multiple conference papers at the University of London.

Recently Read:

Multiple books and articles on Charles Dickens and nineteenth-century animals.

What Students May Not Know:

I’ve lost count of the bones I’ve broken. Also, one of my favorite hobbies, since a child, is chopping firewood (is that odd?).

Why I Teach:

I enjoy discussing new and changing perspectives on our world, especially those reflected in literature and film. And, well, there are so many other reasons that I dare not attempt to explain them here.

Tim Walters

Tim Walters (Salmon Arm)

Tim was raised in Middlesbrough, a failing industrial town in the North East of England, and moved to Canada during the 'difficult' teenage years, a transition from which he has never fully recovered, and which in part explains his peculiar accent. He was educated at McMaster University in Hamilton, a failing industrial town in Southern Ontario, where he received an Honours BA in English and Minor in Psychology (1997), an MA in English (1998), and a PhD in English and Cultural Studies (2004). Tim taught a variety of Literature, Film, and Cultural Studies courses at McMaster and the University of Guelph before moving to Salmon Arm, a town that is neither failing nor industrial, in 2006.

At some point in the past decade, Tim became enamoured of the (admittedly strange and perhaps naive) idea that discussing books, films, and cultural theory with students could help make the world a more tolerable place, and so tries to teach accordingly. His primary areas of interest are contemporary British and American fiction, film, and cultural theory, and he has published and/or presented papers on: Vladimir Nabokov, Julian Barnes, Canadian juvenilia, Brett Easton Ellis, Lars von Trier and the dogme95 manifesto, Chuck Palahniuk and Slavoj Zizek, subversive cinema, and Ward Churchill and the 9/11 controversy.

After two years serving as the President of the OCFA (Okanagan College Faculty Association), he is taking a leave to work on a book length study of the complex and perverse relationship between football and late-captitalism, tentatively titled Poetry at Auschwitz: Globalization and the Beautiful Game. When in Salmon Arm, Tim is a member of the Eco-Committee, Campus Life Committee, College football team, and is the organizer of "College Nights at the Classic," a weekly film series at the Salmar Classic theatre.

Credentials:

Ph.D., MA, Hon BA - English and Cultural Studies (McMaster)

Recent Projects:

This summer I gave a talk called "The Good Terror: Fight Club as Žižekian Act-ion Film" at the Popular Culture Association Conference in Boston. I'm presenting a section of my forthcoming book on football at the Football and Communities Conference in Sydney, Australia, in February 2013.

Recently Read:

Rising Up and Rising Down: Some Thoughts on Violence, Freedom, and Urgent Means by William Vollman, Football in Sun and Shadow by Eduardo Galleano, Deep Green Resistance by Derrick Jensen, Aric McBay, and Lierre Keith, and Living in the End Times by Slavoj Zizek.

What Students May Not Know:

As an experiment, for the last two years I wore exactly the same outfit every day. I care more about the fate of Middlesbrough Football Club than any other person in the Okanagan valley. And I like cats.

Why I Teach:

Because when I was an undergrad I realized that I liked lounging around talking about books and films more than doing just about anything else, and I've yet to find anyone who'll pay me to do that in a pub.