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College passes $95-million balanced budget
College event focuses on local community impact on global change
Project Management program earns international approval
Lovig crushes 10 K record at Okanagan College race
Tech sector forecasts significant demand, nationally and locally
Award remembers Okanagan College student and aids another in following his dream
Trifecta finish for College’s Enactus team at regional competition
Benefit of small class-sizes and campus community draws students to College, hear more at upcoming info nights in Vernon and Kelowna
Sentes donation continues regional auto dealers’ strong support of trades expansion at Okanagan College
Speaker to give inspiring talk about Aboriginal youth empowering change
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College passes $95-million balanced budget
Okanagan College Media Release

Okanagan College’s Board of Governors has passed a $94.95 million operating budget for the coming fiscal year.

“We have passed a balanced operating budget that allows us to continue to provide programs and services throughout the region, without any service reductions or layoffs,” explains Okanagan College Board of Governors Chair Tom Styffe.

“It wasn’t easy, and we are looking to departments and our staff to find some significant savings in a variety of areas,” observed Styffe.

“When we first reviewed our budget for the coming year, we were facing a seven-digit issue, created by a number of pressures. Administration and staff have found ways to increase revenue through growth in some areas, and means to pare expenditures that allow us to balance the budget.”

The Board’s budget included provision for increased tuition revenue, both from growth in the number of international students and Continuing Studies activity and from a two per cent increase in tuition rates. 

For a full-time student taking university transfer arts, the increase will add about $32.67 per semester, bringing a semester’s tuition to $1,666.11. For a student taking the office assistant program, the increase will add about $42.82 for the program (total tuition of $2,183.79). A Level 1 Auto Service Technician apprentice will see tuition increase by about $14.50 to $739.63.

The Board also made a decision to hold off charging fees for either Adult Basic Education or English as a Second Language courses for domestic students for the 2015-16 year. The province recently changed policy to allow public institutions to charge for those program areas, and announced funding reductions, although those were offset with one-time transitional funding for the coming year.

Over the course of the next several months, Okanagan College is to develop a plan for which courses the institution might charge tuition for. The Board will review that plan before implementing any fees.

“We believe it is important to do the research about how ABE and ESL fees may affect our students,” said Styffe. “At a time when so many jobs require higher education, there is a great deal of interest in preserving access to these program areas.”
College event focuses on local community impact on global change
Okanagan College Media Release

Janine Roth March 2015Kelowna resident Janine Roth was raised to recognize that not everyone in the world is as fortunate as most Canadians, and that time truly is the most valuable thing we can all give. 

The 29-year-old Okanagan College International Development diploma student has travelled and contributed to international development aid efforts in Haiti, Uganda, Kenya, Israel, Venezuela, Mexico, and China.

“I wanted to go to these countries to hear and see for myself what those communities needed,” says Roth. “It’s important to focus our development efforts on what the people in those countries tell us they need, versus us going in with our own ideas of what we think they need.”

On April 8 the public is invited to explore the issues developing countries face, and hear from the individuals and organizations in our Okanagan community who are helping transform the lives of those in need. 

The inaugural International Development Night will be hosted at Okanagan College’s Kelowna Campus in the Student Services Building from 4 to 6 p.m. 

Roth travelled to Haiti when she was 19 to volunteer with school children in the community and orphanages, and returned there in 2011 with a group from her Kelowna church to provide further aid and support. It comes as no surprise that prior to pursuing post-secondary education, Roth was named “2010 Volunteer of the Year” by her then-employer, Kelowna-based Disney Interactive Studios Canada. 

“When I worked at Disney, they genuinely fostered my interest in international aid,” adds Roth. “I had the chance to learn from their Corporate Citizenship Program Director, whom I still consider a mentor, and I realized I could turn my love of volunteering into a meaningful career by honing in my skills with some education.”

In winning the volunteerism award through the company, she was awarded a humanitarian aid trip to Kenya affording her the chance to tour and contribute to the various projects with Free the Children that Disney supports. Then, while she was in Haiti, Disney offered her the opportunity to contribute to their ongoing support projects by reviewing and reporting on how the monies were being spent, their impact, and discussing future aid in the community.

“Many of us travel and like to think we are internationally oriented,” says Dr. Rosalind Warner, Chair of Okanagan College’s Political Science Department. “Yet few of us think beyond our day-to-day about how our actions can aid sustainability and development.

“We wanted to create this forum for the community to connect with students, and also to help the general public see all the exciting goodwill projects initiated here that make a real impact in the world.”

The interactive community focused event includes information booths, mini guest lectures (room A125), networking, live music, and light refreshments. It is an opportunity to speak directly with local non-profit organizations about their aid efforts and expand the awareness of the need for individuals to contribute to developing countries beyond our everyday. 

A dozen local non-profit organizations will be in attendance: Hope for the Nations, Partners in the Horn of Africa, Kelowna Zambia Partnership, Developing World Connections, Global Citizen Kelowna, Amnesty International Group 161 Kelowna, Gifts to Grandmothers, World Neighbours Canada, Inter-cultural Women’s Educational Network, Bicycles for Humanity, Potters Without Borders, Little Women for Little Women in Afghanistan.
Project Management program earns international approval
Okanagan College Media Release

Okanagan College has earned the designation of Registered Education Provider (R.E.P.) from the Project Management Institute (PMI), the world’s largest project management member association. 

R.E.P.s are organizations that have been approved by PMI to help project managers achieve and maintain the Project Management Professional (PMP)®, Program Management Professional (PgMP)® and other PMI professional credentials.  

Okanagan College’s project management programming is offered through its Continuing Studies division. Earning the designation means the College has met the criteria for course content, instructor qualification and instructional design. 

“The shift to project-based work we are seeing in many industries, including finance, technology, construction and health, has helped to make project management an increasingly important field of work, and we have seen strong training demand in our region,” said Dennis Silvestrone, Director of Continuing Studies and Corporate Development at Okanagan College. “Our program receiving this designation means our students are assured their education meets the highest professional standards and can be used to earn professional development units.” 

Okanagan College joins more than 1,500 R.E.P.s in more than 80 countries. These organizations include commercial training providers, academic institutions, and corporate training departments within corporations and government agencies.   

For more information about the College’s Project Management Certificate program, visit the website: www.okanagan.bc.ca/cs
Lovig crushes 10 K record at Okanagan College race
Okanagan College Media Release

LovigMore than 400 runners crossed the finish line on Sunday at Okanagan College’s 13th annual Half Marathon, 10 K and Relay Race in Kelowna.

The women’s 10 K course record was shattered by Kelowna’s Christy Lovig (36:48). Salmon Arm’s Glynis Sim (38:32) finished second and Kelowna’s Martha Sirdevan (42:39) was third.

The men’s 10 K race was won by Greg Edgar (35:49). Second and third place went to the father-son duo of Jacab and Jeremy Harris; they crossed the finish line together with a time of 36:36.

The half marathon men’s race was won by Vernon’s Aaron Heidt (1:14:49). Kelowna runners Jeff Vogt (1:17:19) and Rory Switzer (1:21:09) finished second and third, respectively.

The female half marathon was won by Claire Young (1:26:44), followed by Tracy Dayman (1:33:48) and then Cindy Rhodes (1:34:19), all from Kelowna.

The half marathon relay event was won by a team from Fresh Air Experience in Kelowna. The team of five runners worked together to achieve a time of 1:38:36.

“We couldn’t have asked for a better day for this event and the group of runners and volunteers who took part this year were incredible,” said Christine Ulmer, Race Director. “I heard runners saying they couldn’t have experienced better weather for this time of year – it was the perfect temperature and nice and dry. The course was really well managed by a great group of volunteers and as always, our participants brought a huge amount of energy to the event.”

The Okanagan College Half Marathon, 10 K and Relay is an annual not-for-profit event that raises funds to support student bursaries.

Complete race results are available online: www.okanagan.bc.ca/halfmarathon.

Tech sector forecasts significant demand, nationally and locally
Okanagan College Media Release

More than 6,500 skilled individuals are the driving force of the Okanagan’s billion-dollar tech industry but a recent national report forecasts a shortage of the homegrown talent to fill the demand for tech jobs by 2019.

It is clear there are opportunities in the Okanagan to take advantage of job openings in the rapidly growing tech sector. 

“Youth in our community looking for jobs, need to look no further than the tech sector,” says Phil Ashman, Associate Dean of Science, Technology and Health at Okanagan College. “With the right training, hands-on experience, and industry contacts, thriving careers are within grasp for our students.” 

“Since we launched our accelerator programs in 2011,” notes Accelerate Okanagan’s CEO Pilar Portela, “our clients have hired over 360 employees, and we see this growth and demand on the Accelerate Okanagan job board too, which has had more than 55 jobs posted to it this year alone. There is clearly a demand for talent.”

“This is why our partnership with Okanagan College is so important,” continues Portela, “We provide direct access to the needs of the thriving Okanagan technology sector, which allows the College to create innovative curricula that will develop local, highly skilled, high-tech talent.”

In the Labour Market Outlook 2015-2019 report released last week by the Information and Communication Technology Council of Canada, it is estimated there will be a talent supply shortage in filling 182,000 tech jobs in Canada in the next five years.

The growth of the tech sector in the Okanagan can be attributed to strong innovation and startups, but information technology permeates all aspects of the business world.  There are 100,730 British Columbians who work in technology, but of these only 44,000 actually work for a tech-based company. The majority in fact work in other sectors, including finance, health, and energy, providing technology support to the business needs that advance our economy.

Top in-demand jobs expected in the province are computer programmers and interactive media developers, software engineers, and support technicians. Okanagan College is committed to training students to supply this demand by offering three programs, all of which include a co-op component.  

“Through applied learning, our students gain hands-on experience that is valuable as they enter careers in technology,” remarks Ashman. “We are committed to fostering partnerships with industry in our region, and as such we are able to successfully help students find job-opportunities, ultimately helping meet the sector’s demand.” 

The College offers a four-year Computer Information Systems degree and a two-year Computer Information Systems diploma, which include software design and development, database management, development and administration, and incorporates mathematics, business, and communications courses. The programs are offered at the Kelowna, Penticton and Vernon campuses.

The two-year Network and Telecommunications Engineering Technology diploma teaches students network infrastructure, telecommunication, and client/server administration, and also includes business courses to ensure students are prepared to tackle tech solutions for the broad range of businesses requiring tech infrastructure. 

"Acro Media is focused on applied skill sets in order to staff our software programming department in Kelowna,” says Becky Parisotto, Senior Project Manager at Acro Media. “The graduates from Okanagan College have been working closely with our business as co-op students, and growing into valuable employees for the past two years.

“The learning we see the students receive is ground-level, focusing on hard skills as opposed to concepts; which marries perfectly for joining our growing work force and resourcing needs,” adds Parisotto. “Their abilities to grasp new concepts with low ego and high work ethic motivates us as a local company to continue to go back to the well of talent at the College for recruitment and hiring.”
Award remembers Okanagan College student and aids another in following his dream
Okanagan College Media Release

Brad Atkins and Harder Family LR March 2015A young man’s dream of becoming an aircraft mechanic and pilot ended when his life was cut short by a tragic accident. Now, the award created in his memory is inspiring another student to pursue the lofty goal they shared.

Brad Atkins of Vernon is the recipient of the first annual Tim Harder Memorial Award, a $1,000 bursary created to support students in the Aircraft Maintenance Engineering (AME) program at Okanagan College.

“I couldn’t be more grateful for this award,” says Atkins. “I can’t even put it into words.

“I feel very privileged, and I want to express my deepest thanks to the Harder family and to let them know just how much this award means to me. It takes an incredible weight off my shoulders to know that I have these funds to put towards living expenses and tuition for the rest of my program.” 

During the award presentation at Okanagan College’s Aerospace Campus in Vernon, Tim Harder’s parents, Drs. James and Joyce Harder, reflected on why they chose to establish the award in their son’s memory and their hopes for what it will achieve.

“When Tim died, our family and friends wanted to do something to honour his memory,” explains Joyce Harder. 

“We knew that it had been a struggle for Tim to go back to school after all those years, and so we decided to help other students in a similar situation,” says James Harder. “Okanagan College has been extremely helpful in making this happen.”

Harder was 30 years old when he decided to follow his passion and pursue a career in aviation, enrolling in the AME program at Okanagan College’s Aerospace Campus. He hoped one day to also attain his commercial pilot’s license and fly up north during the summer while pursuing his other passion, ski coaching, during the winter.

Sadly, after completing the first year of the program, Harder perished in a tragic motor vehicle accident. His parents established the annual award in his name through the Okanagan College Foundation; the award is intended to assist mature students enrolled in the AME program.

“Tim Harder brought a lot of life and laughter to the AME program and was great at encouraging fellow classmates to keep their goals in perspective,” says Dale Keegstra, Manager, Aerospace Department, Aircraft Maintenance Engineering M-License. “He was always willing to help out in the shop when someone needed an extra hand to get a job done. Tim had a genuine love for mechanics and the aviation industry.” 

Atkins, who has completed the first 48 weeks of training for the AME M-License through Okanagan College, will now embark for the final 14 weeks of training at Northern Lights College in Dawson Creek. 

Like Harder, Atkins also has a great love for the outdoors and for coaching/teaching outdoor skills. Atkins founded his own business, Backcountry Avalanche Awareness, an avalanche skills training company, four years ago and has continued to operate the business while completing his studies at Okanagan College.

“It’s been a challenge returning to school as a mature student, completing my courses while still running my own business,” says Atkins. “But I’m so excited for the career this will allow me to have, and it’s been very fulfilling to be able to continue helping people through education while also continuing my own education.”

The AME program prepares apprentices to certify an aircraft after maintenance, inspection, repair or modification. Training on both rotary wing aircraft (helicopters) and fixed wing aircraft is provided, and covers a wide range of subjects with emphasis on practical training and job-readiness. 

For more information about this and other awards available at Okanagan College, please visit www.okanagan.bc.ca/awards.
Trifecta finish for College’s Enactus team at regional competition
Okanagan College Media Release

The winning ways of Okanagan College’s business administration students continue, with podium finishes for three teams at the Enactus Western Canadian regional championships held in Calgary recently.Enactus Entrepreneurship March 2015

A team comprised of five College students won first place at the competition in the entrepreneurship category. Kelowna’s Darren Gillespie, Cooper Simson, Brent Basil and Emilia Muscardin, joined by Pentictonite Suzanne Newton showcased the work they did in a project called Innspire, which benefited Inn from the Cold, a Kelowna homeless shelter. The students developed a social enterprise that focused on sales of repurposed soap to benefit and profile the Chandler House and the issue of homelessness.

The regional competition win means the Entrepreneurship team advances to the national competition in Toronto in May. 

Capturing second place at the competition in the Eco-Living green category were students Abbey Jones, Sakura Hirata, Aaron Gregory, Rob Larkin and Carly Suddard. 

The team’s projects that impressed judges at the event, held in Calgary, included Instill Life and Innspire. Instill Life is a project that puts Enactus Okanagan College students into classrooms to educate Grade 5 and 6 students with interactive workshops on a variety of topics such as financial literacy, entrepreneurship, and sustainability. The children learn about local foods and agriculture as well as about agricultural entrepreneurs from around the world, they then create greeting cards out of their own personal artwork and are taught how to become entrepreneurs themselves by selling the cards for a profit. This profit is then micro-lent to an entrepreneur of the students’ choice in a developing country.

A third team from Okanagan College placed third in the financial literacy category, comprised of Vernon student Christianne Edbald and Kelowna students Daniel Alfred, Minami Endo, Talasa Larder and Rebecca Alfred. Their projects included two financial literacy programs run for low-income earners called Dollars and Sense and MAPS (Mentorship for All Parents).

"It's amazing to see the passion and determination that our Enactus teams, and the other teams across Canada have for helping those in our communities,” noted Tom Arrowsmith, the President of Enactus Okanagan College. “I couldn't be more proud of the success we have had this year at the regional exhibition, and I look forward to what lies ahead for the Enactus Okanagan College team." 

"This year we brought a very new team to the Enactus regional event and I am very excited that the team once again excelled,” observed Dr. Sheilagh Seaton, faculty advisor with the first-place entrepreneurial team. “It confirms the passion and ability of our students to implement entrepreneurial projects that address the social, economic and environmental needs of our region."  

“The outcomes at regional competition are a testament to the quality of the projects we run across the region and the incredible support we have from our students, institution and the communities we serve,” says Dr. Kyleen Myrah, faculty advisor for Enactus Okanagan College.”

“The competition results speak to the quality of the effort the students expend on these projects, but the real payback is for our community,” says Okanagan College President Jim Hamilton. “The projects benefit organizations and move forward the agenda on financial literacy, entrepreneurship and sustainability, and they also provide hands-on learning for students who carry their skills and commitment to these causes into their careers.”

Enactus Okanagan College involves students from each of Okanagan College’s four major campuses. To learn more visit www.enactusoc.ca.
Benefit of small class-sizes and campus community draws students to College, hear more at upcoming info nights in Vernon and Kelowna
Okanagan College Media Release

Tim Osborne March 2015Good things come in small packages. At Okanagan College the small class sizes at its four local campuses continue to be a differentiator for prospective students.

“Class size is the key piece,” says 32-year-old Vernon student Tim Osborne who is completing his Associate of Arts Degree along with some science foundation courses at the College. “When there are only 10 to 30 students in a class, you have more one-on-one time with your instructors. They genuinely care about your education, helping you learn. I felt they were invested in my success for the future.”

At three upcoming information sessions in Vernon and Kelowna, high-school students, their parents, and anyone considering further studies for additional training or a career change are invited to hear from Okanagan College instructors and students including Osborne about the learning options available to them. The sessions will also provide information about university transfer credits, financial aid and awards, and discuss career options for those pursuing studies in arts, science and business.

The Arts and Science information session will be held on Tuesday March 31 at the Vernon Campus lecture theatre and also on Wednesday April 1 at the Kelowna Campus in the Atrium of the Centre for Learning. A Business program information session will also be held in Vernon (room E102/103) on March 31. All sessions commence at 6 p.m.

Beyond receiving valuable information about programs offered by the College, those in attendance will also have the chance to hear about the academic and social culture on campus.

“The College is a real community,” adds Osborne. “I’ve taken courses at both the Vernon and Salmon Arm campuses. Because of the smaller campuses, the place becomes familiar. It was easy to meet friends and peers to help me study.”

Instructors are also a key part of the College community. Osborne credits the industry-expertise of the faculty for fostering an unexpected interest in sciences for him. He will pursue psychology and English when he transfers to UBC Okanagan next year.

“I’m an arts student, and had no science experience. I took a biology for arts course at the College. The instructor would actually approach students when he felt as though clarity was not fully attained. It was this help and knowledge that helped me achieve one of my highest grades that semester.

“The instructors know you by name. I don’t feel like I am just a number to them.”
Sentes donation continues regional auto dealers’ strong support of trades expansion at Okanagan College
Okanagan College Media Release

One of the valley’s most prominent automotive dealers has come forward with a major donation towards the renovation and expansion of Okanagan College’s Trades Training Complex, and the support goes far beyond dollars and cents.OC Trades Launch

Sentes Automotive has pledged $50,000 toward the Bright Horizons Building for Skills fundraising campaign to support a student study space in the new trades tower currently under construction along KLO Road in Kelowna.

“Our company recognizes the impact that new trades students and apprentices have, not only on our business, but on the industry as a whole throughout the Okanagan,” says Adam Rich, General Manager of Sentes. “We see the skills and the energy these young people bring to the table, and we’re proud to support their training.

“We feel it’s very important to give back in a way that can help transform people’s lives. We live and operate in the valley, so it’s important to us to support local causes, and obviously education is one of the most impactful. Formal training is so vital for people looking to be successful in this sector, given how quickly the technologies advance,” adds Rich.

The new complex will allow the College to train over 2,400 foundation students and apprentices every year, which will help further establish this region as a hub for trades training, says Jim Hamilton, President of Okanagan College. 

“We are very grateful to local industry leaders like Sentes Automotive who are helping us build for the future, and personally to Adam Rich for his efforts as a champion for the campaign out in the community," said Hamilton.

The Sentes Automotive donation has special meaning for Rich, who is volunteering his time as Automotive Sector Chair for the campaign. Rich notes that he saw the necessity to help raise awareness and ensure that the community understands the importance of trades training, given the demand in the Okanagan.

“It is great forethought on the College’s part to make this expansion now, with all the projections pointing to a shortage in skilled labour over the next decade. This new complex is a great way to stay out in front of that.”

Sentes Automotive operates six dealerships from Vernon to Penticton and is one of the largest automotive industry employers in the region with 265 employees. 

The Bright Horizons Building for Skills fundraising campaign for the $33-million complex renovation and expansion project launched in October 2014. The goal of the campaign is to raise $5 million for capital construction costs and $2 million for program and student support. The provincial government has committed $28 million to the project.

Rich says the buzz around the campaign has been very positive since it was announced, especially among auto dealers. The Kelowna Auto Dealers Association’s pledge of $10,000 was one of the early donations that helped to kick off the campaign and dealerships throughout the valley have collectively provided over $600,000 to date.

“Our group has experienced times when technicians were hard to find; sometimes the demand is such that they can’t be trained fast enough—so it’s wonderful that the College is being mindful of this and is expanding to meet the need. It can only mean more opportunities for students, which is great.”

Okanagan College is currently the second largest trades training institution in B.C. When completed in spring of 2016, the new complex will be one of the largest, most sustainable trades training facilities in Western Canada. To learn more about the campaign’s current needs and opportunities to get involved, please visit www.okanagan.bc.ca/campaign.
Speaker to give inspiring talk about Aboriginal youth empowering change

Okanagan College Media Release

In British Columbia, there are 64,100 Aboriginal youth aged 10- to 24-years-old. It is believed in some Aboriginal cultures and heritages that this “eighth generation” will be the generation to impact change.

Aboriginal people today are laying the foundation for the eighth fire to be lit. The generation to come includes those who make a choice of coming together for community, the environment, and to fundamentally shift ways of knowing and doing.

Gabrielle Scrimshaw webOn Thursday March 26, Okanagan College will host nationally recognized, and member of the Hatchet Lake First Nations, Gabrielle Scrimshaw for a public guest lecture titled “Aboriginal Leadership & Education: our shared Canadian Journey” at both the Kelowna and Vernon campuses. She will speak about how Aboriginal people are growing in numbers, educational rates and what it means for the Canadian economy.

“We have more than 1,500 Aboriginal students registered in our diverse programs, which is triple what it was 10 years ago,” says Anthony Isaac, Aboriginal Access and Services Coordinator at Okanagan College. “We’re excited to have such an influential speaker, someone many students can relate to, come to our campuses to inspire and engage our community in the broader conversation about diversity and our growing economy.”

From 2006 to 2011 the national Aboriginal population increased by 20.1 per cent, compared with a growth of 5.2 per cent of non-Aboriginal as per Statistics Canada. With this growth, a movement is seeing Aboriginal youth more inspired than ever in their pursuit of education and training. This positively impacts the Canadian economy, social health system, and contributes to meeting the anticipated demand for a skilled workforce of the future.

Saskatchewan-raised Scrimshaw is recognized for driving awareness about the growth, success, and leadership of Aboriginal youth. She is an advocate for promoting equality of First Nations in our economy, while upholding the rich cultural heritage of Aboriginal people.

She co-founded the Aboriginal Professional Association of Canada, and was the recipient of the 2013 Indspire First Nations Youth award, one of the highest honours within the Aboriginal community. An experienced public speaker, she has presented to youth at the G8/G20 MY SUMMITS program and also attended the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) and CEO Summits in Japan as a Voices of the Future delegate where she spoke about foreign policy to world leaders.

The public is invited to hear from Scrimshaw on March 26 at the Okanagan College Kelowna Campus at 10 a.m. in the Atrium of the Centre for Learning, and also at the Vernon Campus in the Lecture Theatre at 1 p.m.

Galactic stars to beetle shells, the universe is explored in two upcoming Science in Society Speakers Series in Vernon
Okanagan College Media Release

Exploring Earth’s smallest yet most beautiful particles to the sparkling farthest reaches of space, the Science in Society Speakers Dr. Geraldine Peters Mar 2015Series concludes with two talks that span the gamut of matter in our universe.

On Thursday March 26, American astrophysicist Dr. Geraldine J. Peters will speak about marvelous binary stars and on Thursday April 2, nano-materials scientist Dr. Mark MacLachlan will discuss how colourful bugs are inspiring new materials. Both events will be held at the Okanagan College Vernon campus lecture theatre at 7:30 p.m. 

Distinguished astrophysicist Dr. Peters from the University of Southern California will transport the audience to the dynamic realms of space as she discusses key advancements in understanding the inter-relationship of binary stars. These are two stars that operate in a system where they orbit around their own common centre of mass. 

In her research, facilitated by significant NASA grants, Peters utilizes spectra data including from the Hubble Space Telescope to explore the transfer of material between these co-related stars that result in spectacular interactions. The presentation will illustrate extraordinary bi-polar jet streams and splashes of hot mass transfer from one star to the surface of the other.

The talk titled “Close binary stars: what spacecraft observations have revealed about their interactions” is sponsored by the American Astronomical Society as part of the Harlow Shapely Visiting Lectureship program. The March 26 event is free for the public (donations accepted). 

Dr. Mark MacLachlan Mar 2015Returning to earthly matters, Dr. MacLachlan, Chemistry professor at the University of British Columbia, dives into the beautiful world of how plants and animals uniquely amazing characteristics inspire scientists in their pursuit to create new materials with improved strength, durability, and elasticity with his talk titled “Bug shells and butterfly wings: can nature inspire the creation of new materials?

Imagine a form of glass that reflects light similarly to a beetle’s shell. In his research of materials one-thousandth of the width of a hair, which the eye can only see using an electron microscope, Dr. MacLachlan and his team have developed glass and similar materials using the same spiral structure the beetle possesses.

Admission to the April 2 event is $7 in advance or $10 at the door. For advanced tickets, please call the Okanagan Science Centre at (250) 545-3644 and visit okanagansisss.wordpress.com for more information

“We strive to present a diverse range of speakers to suit a multitude of interests in science for the public to enjoy,” says Okanagan College Chemistry professor Carl Doige, who helps coordinates the series along with the Okanagan Science Centre. “The range of expertise demonstrates how science is applicable within so many aspects of our society. This year we explored themes in sports performance, building materials, protecting the wildlife that are vital to our ecosystems, and even what we ponder when we gaze at the stars.”

This year’s speakers, in addition to Dr. Peters and Dr. McLachlan, captured the science in our midst with presentations by award-winning wildlife photographer Ian McAllister, CBC’s Quirks & Quarks host Bob McDonald, and neuroscientist Dr. Paul van Donkelaar.

The Science in Society Speaker Series is proudly sponsored by the Best Western Vernon Lodge, Cooper’s Food, Starbucks Coffee, and the Vernon Morning Star.
College business students reach podium twice in western Canadian competitions
Okanagan College Media Release

HR Team Business March 2015Okanagan College’s School of Business earned more hardware last weekend in the areas of accounting and human resources when two teams of students made their way to the podium in two separate western Canadian business competitions. 

In Winnipeg, Okanagan College’s team of Lexi Keen and Rue Mulimba took silver in the 2015 CPA Case Competition, after qualifying in a competitive preliminary round in February. They were second only to Thompson Rivers University; other finalists included the University of Alberta, University of Regina, Mount Royal University, and a second team from Okanagan College.  

“This result really does speak volumes about the quality of our program as this competition is normally reserved for third- and fourth-year students,” said professor and team coach Adrian Fontenla. “Our team included a second-year student.”

In Calgary, Okanagan College’s Bria Young, Ryan Lazauskas and Miranda Birkbeck finished third in the 2015 HRC West case competition. 

HRC West includes a preliminary and final round. Okanagan College advanced to the finals along with the University of Alberta and the host team from Mount Royal University.  

“Competing in the HRC West was a great experience,” said fourth-year business student Bria Young. “It was a very competitive field and so it was nice to place.”

Young will be graduating with a degree in business this June and says the experience she has gained from participating in competitions with the College has been invaluable. 

“It gives you an opportunity to gain practical experience while still in school,” she said. “You get to find solutions to real problems faced by companies and apply your education. I’ve also made a huge improvement in my public speaking and am much more comfortable presenting in front of groups and that is something I will definitely benefit from once I enter the workforce.” 

The College’s HRC West team was coached by professors Laura Thurnheer and Roger Wheeler. 

“Our top three result really demonstrates the abilities of our students,” said Wheeler. “It was tough competition, and I was impressed with the poise and professionalism they displayed under pressure. They represented our school very well.” 
A lifetime of tools donated to Okanagan College
Okanagan College Media Release

A local tradesperson’s generous donation of thousands of dollars of highly sought-after precision measurement tools will give Mary & Bill Schoof Mar 2015Okanagan College students some heavy-duty hands-on learning opportunities. 

Bill Schoof, a retired journeyman, has donated his collection of machinist tools to Okanagan College after learning about the renovation and expansion of the Trades Training Complex at the Kelowna campus.

“If you’re learning a trade you need more than books, you need the right tools in your hand as well,” says Schoof. “The College already has great equipment, of course, but I know that good tools are always in demand, always appreciated. I was glad to hear that they would benefit students and I’m happy to see them put to good use.”

“It’s been wonderful to see the support from the community as our new Trades Training Complex comes together,” says Steve Moores, Dean of Trades and Apprenticeship. “We greatly appreciate donations of equipment like this. They enrich our programs. They help us ensure that students have opportunities to work on and learn on a wide variety of equipment that they’ll encounter out in their industries.” 

“I want to extend a sincere thank-you on behalf of Okanagan College to Mr. Schoof for this generous gift. As a journeyperson machinist and tool and die maker myself, I feel a special connection to these tools and the trade, and I appreciate that Mr. Schoof has chosen to share an important part of his life’s work to inspire our students,” adds Moores.

Schoof’s donation is one of several major donations of equipment to the Bright Horizons Building for Skills fundraising campaign, which was launched last fall by the Okanagan College Foundation, with the goal of raising $5 million for capital construction costs and $2 million for program and student support. In addition to over $3.5 million in funds raised, several local individuals and organizations have contributed equipment, including Art Salt, who donated a Caterpillar front-end loader to the College last year.

Schoof’s collection includes digital vernier calipers, micrometers and other machinist equipment, and is valued at over $4,500. The equipment will be used by students in the automotive service technician and mechanical engineering technology programs. 

According to Schoof, the tools took half a life-time to acquire, spanning the course of his 40-year career as a tool and die-maker. He reflected on the difficulty of acquiring them, piece-by-piece, while also working full-time during his training.

“I took a little out of my paycheque each month to buy them,” explains Schoof. “It meant scrimping and saving, but it was a labour of love. So I know how hard it is for students starting out, and I believe we need to support them.”

Born in Windsor Ontario, Schoof moved to the Okanagan in 2002 with his wife, Mary, after retiring from the tool and die industry. 

“It’s been wonderful to see how Okanagan College has grown over the past 15 years,” adds Schoof. “These students are going to work hard and put so much back into the area.”

Okanagan College is currently the second largest trades training institution in BC. When completed in spring of 2016, the new complex will be one of the largest, most sustainable trades training facilities in Western Canada. To learn more about the campaign’s current needs and opportunities to get involved, please visit www.okanagan.bc.ca/campaign.
Collaborating friends earn top-three spots in heavyweight Spaghetti Bridge contest
Okaangan College Media Release

Adrian Schartner March 2015It came down to a battle between three friends from Lumby at Okanagan College’s 32nd annual Spaghetti Bridge Contest held at the Kelowna campus today.

Grade 7 student Adrian Schartner from Lumby placed first with his bridge weighing 982.6 grams and supporting 275.6 kilograms before spectacularly collapsing in front of cheering friends, peers, teachers and parents. His bridge was the only one to break the 200-kilogram load threshold. Brendan Mattenley placed second with 196.68 kilograms of load, and in third was defending champion James Dessert with 171.83 kilograms. 

Taking almost eight weeks of patience, imagination and hard work, the three friends collaborated on the engineering design concept that featured an impressive arch made of bucatini pasta and spaghetti spokes. Each then made individual modifications to their bridge to encourage a little friendly competition.

“We knew we wanted curved bridges, those always do well in the competition,” says 12-year-old Schartner, who is home-schooled. “For my bridge, I created a heavier arch by using four strands of barilla. While it’s a lighter pasta, having more of it made it stronger.”

“This is my first year participating. I’m pretty excited because I came into the competition hoping to place third,” he adds, after being presented with a $1500 prize cheque, courtesy of the event’s sponsors: the Applied Science Technologists and Technicians of British Columbia (ASTTBC), PCL Construction, Okanagan College Students’ Union, MMM Group, AECOM, OP Machine Ltd., Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of BC (APEG), WSP Group, and Interior Testing Services Ltd.

“It was amazing to see such talent in our youth and future professionals,” says Phil Ashman, the day’s emcee and Associate Dean of Science, Technology and Health at Okanagan College. “These students are determined. Many of them returning year after year, improving on their technique and structure.”

With otherwise simple ingredients, nothing more than pasta and glue, 248 participating students created recipes for success with their bridges. Students from Lumby and Salmon Arm in the north all the way to Osoyoos in the south participated in building bridges in both demonstration and competition categories. In the team-building category, 58 teams registered (48 in secondary and 10 in the post-secondary division). The Spaghetti Bridge world record of 443.58 kilograms was established in Kelowna in 2009 by a team from Hungary and continues to be undefeated. 

Complete Results

Heavyweight
First – Adrian Schartner, Grade 7, home-schooled, Lumby
Bridge weighed: 982.6 grams 
Bridge held: 275.6 kg

Second – Brendan Mattenley, Grade 10 Charles Bloom Secondary, Lumby
Bridge weighed: 989.7 g 
Bridge held: 196.7 kg

T
hird – James Dessert, Grade 9 Charles bloom Secondary, Lumby
Bridge weighed: 909.9 g 
Bridge held: 171.8 kg

Team Building, Post-Secondary
First – Anna Offenwanger, Marissa White, Ephraim Nowak, UBC Okanagan
Second – Kyler Lucas, Rhett Munson, Curtis Hull, Taylor Milsom, Okanagan College 
Third – Julie Humphries, Robert Kemmler, Derek Penson, Siyuan Liu, Okanagan College

Team Building, Secondary
First –Alizon Littleton, Micah McKerlich, Katelyn Zylyk, Braeden Brown, Grade 7, Okanagan Mission Secondary, Kelowna
Second –Joy Savanagouder, Matthew Sharratt, Grade 9, Kings Christian School, Salmon Arm
Third– Jacob Legg, Dayton Wykes, Nathan Karlsson, Grade 9, Glenrosa Middle School, West Kelowna 

Individual Secondary 
First – Liam Davis, Grade 8, Charles Bloom Secondary, Lumby (with team members: Dean Corce, Eddie Harvey)
Second– Ryan Baril, Grade 8, Charles Bloom Secondary, Lumby 
Third – Esther Drysdale, Grade 8, Charles Bloom Secondary, Lumby

BC Wine Information Society Award helps viticulture student grow her education
Okanagan College Media Release

BC Wine Info Society Mar 2015The pursuit of a career in the wine industry just got a little sweeter for an Okanagan College student thanks to a bursary from the BC Wine Information Society, in recognition of her early achievements in the field. 

Kathleen McCaffrey, who is currently completing the Viticulture Certificate program at the College’s Penticton campus, is the recipient of the 2015 BC Wine Information Society Award, valued at $1,500. 

“I am so excited and grateful for this award,” says McCaffrey, who completed a degree in Business at Okanagan College before enrolling in the Viticulture program. “It’s a huge boost and will help with tuition for the next course I’m taking, which is focused on wine sales.”

“On behalf of the BC Wine Information Society, I would like to congratulate Kathleen McCaffrey on her accomplishments in the Viticulture program,” says Laura Kowalchuk, Manager B.C. Wine Information Centre, which is operated by the Society. 

“The wine industry is a key driver of our region’s economy and so we feel it’s hugely important to support students in the valley,” explains Kowalchuk. “We are so excited to see what students like Kathleen will accomplish as they jump into this industry and put their energy and creativity into elevating the profile of B.C. wine even further.”

The bursary is one of two annual awards sponsored by the BC Wine Information Society, which also made a $300,000 donation to the College last year to assist with the creation of a new Wine Sensory Centre at the Penticton campus. The new centre opened in fall of 2014 and has since become one of the key instructional hubs for the College’s Food, Wine, and Tourism programming.

“Food, Wine, and Tourism is about studying and celebrating the uniqueness of the Okanagan Valley and the people who make these industries a huge success,” says Jonathan Rouse, Director of Food, Wine and Tourism and Associate Dean of Okanagan College’s School of Business. “We’re very grateful and excited that organizations like the BC Wine Information Society continue to support and work with us as we develop and deliver our programs. It makes the student experience that much more rewarding.”

McCaffrey credits the Okanagan’s buzzing wine industry and a trip to Italy last summer as the inspiration to delve deeper into the study of wine. She stomped grapes and worked in cellars while traveling through Tuscany and the Aosta Valley. The trip also enlightened McCaffrey to organic grape growing and winemaking techniques—an experience which she says amped up her appreciation for organic growers in the Okanagan.

“There are such exciting things happening in this region. I want to keep going with my education and learn the ins and outs of every job from field to glass,” McCaffrey notes.

The BC Wine Information Centre was the first VQA Wine Store in British Columbia. Today there are 21 stores across B.C. Operated by the BC Wine Information Society, profits are put back into the local community supporting the wine industry.  

"
We are a non-profit organization and every bottle sold benefits the community, be it through supporting student awards such as these or other projects. So people can feel good about buying wine here knowing that it’s having a positive impact locally,” says Kowalchuk.

Okanagan College’s Viticulture program offers a variety of courses focused on everything from the principles of grape growing and winemaking to vineyard management and equipment operation to wine sales and public relations. The program involves both classroom instruction and a work experience component at local vineyards. More information is available at okanagan.bc.ca/fwt.   
Last call for high schools to register for 25th annual math competition
Okanagan College Media Release

Leave your calculators at home: a sharp pencil, an eraser, and your thinking cap is all Grade 8 to 12 students need to participate in the annual British Columbia Secondary School Mathematics Contest (BCSSMC) for the Okanagan Region.

Many local high schools have already registered, but those still wishing to do so have until this Friday, March 6 to sign up for the preliminary round. 

On April 1 hundreds of students in either the junior (Grade 8 to10) or senior (Grade 11 and12) categories will put their math skills to the test as they complete the 45 minute multiple-choice exam administered in each of the participating schools by its teachers. The top three to six finishers from each school will be invited to attend the final round taking place on May 1 at Okanagan College’s Kelowna campus.

“This year is particularly special, as we celebrate 25 years of fostering mathematic interest and talent in secondary school students in our communities,” says regional contest founder, provincial coordinator, and Okanagan College Mathematics professor Clint Lee. “We always see strong participation numbers, sometimes upwards of 800 students, if not more. To me, that speaks volumes about math being an important part of our kids’ education.” 

Finalists will vie for top honours in each category as well as cash prizes. Rewarding the outstanding achievement of the top senior student, a prize of $200 combined with a one-semester tuition scholarship to either Okanagan College or UBC Okanagan, to a maximum value of $3,000 is up for the taking.

There are many ways students can prepare for the challenging math problems that will test both their problem solving skills and understanding of complex mathematic formulas. Some schools host preparation sessions and students can review past contest papers with solutions online (www.people.okanagan.bc.ca/clee/bcssmc).

“It’s wonderful to see the level of engagement and enthusiasm by the students for the math language. One of the best parts is the conversations the contest generates as students go over the problems with their teachers and with one another,” reflects Lee.

The competition was inaugurated in 1990 by Okanagan College’s Mathematics department as a way to bolster interactions between secondary and post-secondary education institutions and to recognize math achievements locally. Today, the competition is co-sponsored by the College and UBCO. The Applied Science Technologists and Technicians of BC (ASTTBC), Mathtoons Media, and the Canadian Mathematics Society (CMS) proudly support rising math talent through their sponsorship of the BCSSMC.
Rotary Club of Kelowna supports Okanagan College efforts to elevate trades training in the region
Okanagan College Media Release

Tradespeople do more than just build houses, they help build communities. This is one of the key messages that a local Rotary club Rotary Club Donation March 2015hopes the community will take away from its decision to support the new trades training complex at Okanagan College.

The Rotary Club of Kelowna has pledged $75,000 to the Bright Horizons, Building for Skills fundraising campaign supporting the $33-million renovation and expansion project currently underway at the College’s Kelowna Campus. 

“Our club has a long history of supporting education,” says Club President Dennis Campbell. “It’s an important part of the culture of what we do. Be it through creating bursaries at the College, or supporting major projects like this, we’re very passionate about helping the next generation of students achieve their educational goals.”

“Trades are a key thrust in our economy,” notes Campbell, “and so it seemed only natural for us to support the training of these young apprentices. When you think about it, you can’t step out your front door and go very far without coming into contact with something that a tradesperson has helped to build, wire, plumb, weld, and so on.”

“We had a chance to speak with students and instructors at the College and learn about the plan for the building,” says Ross Gilley, past-President of the Club. “And when we saw how the expansion will enhance space and equipment for students, we knew it was a worthy project. The College’s efforts will really elevate the profile of trades as a career path in the Okanagan, and we’re proud to support that.”

“The new trades training complex will help us be proactive in addressing the skills gap projected for trades and technical training in B.C. over the next decade,” says Jim Hamilton, President of Okanagan College. “It is truly gratifying for the College to see people and organizations from all over our region stepping up to support the project.”

“We appreciate the Rotary Club of Kelowna’s generous investment in our campus and our students’ futures.”

When doors open in spring of 2016, the three-storey tower will be a significant update for Okanagan College’s trades facilities, some of which date back to the 1960s. The complex will be able to accommodate over 2,400 students per year in trades programs. Okanagan College is currently the second largest trades training institution in B.C. 

"
Our students have a reputation for excellence that we’re very proud of,” says Steve Moores, Dean of Trades and Apprenticeship. “As do our instructors. This new facility will provide an incredible space to learn and work, and, we believe, will further establish the Okanagan region as a hub for trades training in Western Canada.”

The provincial government has committed $28 million to the project. The $7-million Bright Horizons campaign to top up this funding includes $5 million for capital construction and $2 million for program and student support—which will allow the College to explore new trades programs in high demand, as well as create awards and bursaries for students.

The Okanagan College Foundation announced in February that the campaign has officially reached the halfway mark of its overall goal, with over $3.5 million raised. To learn more about the campaign, opportunities to give, and to get involved with the project, please visit http://www.okanagan.bc.ca/campaign.
Explore College education options at upcoming information session in Penticton
Okanagan College Media Release

Coleman Helgerson Mar 2015Making a choice of career and credential can be daunting for many people looking at their post-secondary path.

Quality, cost, and location are all factors that enter the picture. Okanagan College instructors and staff will be on hand to shine a light on all those considerations (and more) at an Arts and Science University Transfer Information Session March 9 at 6 p.m. at the Penticton campus.

The session is open to all potential students, including those graduating from high school, their parents, and anyone considering further studies for additional training or a career change. The event will be held in the atrium of the campus’s Jim Pattison Centre of Excellence.

For students like Summerland’s Coleman Helgerson who is currently in the second year of Okanagan College’s Criminal and Social Justice diploma program, the decision to stay within the beautiful Okanagan valley was easy. 

“One of my main reasons was being able to stay close to home,” says Helgerson. “Having that extra bit of support when it’s needed by being close to family and friends has been great.”

The College’s broad course offerings in university transferable arts and science programs enabled Helgerson to consider various directions for his studies. His education plan evolved over the last couple of years, and Okanagan College afforded him the flexibility of exploration. As a result of small class sizes, students benefit from more time with their instructors, enabling discussions such as how to achieve their educational and professional goals. 

"
The instructors have been a great help, and given me valuable feedback and guidance. That's my favorite part of the program; how much the instructors want to see their students succeed, in whatever chosen career path they have,” adds Helgerson. “As far as the entire College community goes, all the departments work hard to create a positive and energetic environment for students to enjoy.”

Helgerson as well as fellow current students, instructors, Education Advisors, the Aboriginal Transitions Planner, and an Admissions Clerk will be on hand to share the Okanagan College experience and answer questions. This session will also provide information about university transfer credits, financial aid and awards, and discuss career options for those pursuing studies in both arts and science.
Take it outside! Conference focuses on outdoor play
Okanagan College Media Release

Child’s play is serious work for a group of academics, professionals, and planners who will be gathering March 6 at Okanagan Beverlie Dietze Dec 2013College’s Vernon campus to consider the how and why of developing outdoor play spaces and why they are essential for children’s development and for building healthy, sustainable communities.

Shifting Views – Why Children Need Outdoor Play Now!” is a one-day conference being organized by Okanagan College’s Director of Learning and Teaching, Dr. Beverlie Dietze (who is also a principal researcher in outdoor play) and Jane Lister, the College’s North Okanagan Regional Dean. The conference is also being supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, which funded recent research involving Dietze, and the Kelowna-based Outland Design Landscape Architecture company.

“Recent research is really reinforcing how important outdoor play is to children’s development, especially at a time when so much of their activity is focused around electronic devices and digital interaction,” says Dietze. “Having the chance to connect to nature is about a lot more than just the experience of the outdoors. It impacts a whole range of behavior and early childhood development.”

Details of the conference speakers and sessions, as well as instructions on how to register can be found at www.okanagan.bc.ca/play.

The day-long, free conference features a number of experts and workshops. Two Nova Scotians will present the story of Nova Scotia’s Journey of Advancing Outdoor Play – Peter McCracken (who works with the Nova Scotia Department of Health and Wellness) and Laura MacPherson (who works in the same department and also sits on the ParticipACTION’s National Active Play committee.)

Dr. Mariana Brussoni, an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of British Columbia will examine the need for children to have play environments that allow them to take a variety of risks in their outdoor play.  

Dietze will present an overview of the current research in the area of outdoor children’s play and how the research should influence public policy, community development, and how it ties into the UN Conventions on the Rights of the Child.

Fiona Barton, the principal in Outland Design Landscape Architecture, will focus on how important it is for landscape architects to create nurturing outdoor spaces for children. She’ll highlight some new outdoor play designs that incorporate natural materials into play space. 

Dr. Diane Kashin, a registered early childhood educator and College professor, will present a session called Cultivating Children’s Identities Through Outdoor Play.
New awards honour aviation pioneers and help college students take flight
Okanagan College Media Release

Margaret Fane Rutledge Feb 2015Students enrolled in the Commercial Aviation diploma program at Okanagan College will soon get a lift from new awards that recognize the achievements of two distinguished B.C. aviators.

The Roy Clemens Memorial Award in Aviation and Margaret Fane Rutledge Award in Aviation, valued at $1,000 each, celebrate the contributions to Canada’s aviation history made by Clemens and Rutledge over the course of their careers in the air. 

“We are proud to recognize the legacy of these two aviation forerunners” says Barry McGillivray, Associate Dean, Okanagan College School of Business. “These awards in their honour will assist young pilots in their training. Okanagan College is very grateful to the Clemens and Rutledge families for their generous support in creating these awards.” 

“We’ve trained over 400 pilots since the program began in 1990,” says Marc Vanderaegen, Flight School Director, Southern Interior Flight Centre, Okanagan College Commercial Aviation Diploma Program. “And the demand for pilots is only going to increase, with retirements looming in the big airlines. It’s a very exciting time to get into commercial aviation. This program gives students some great opportunities to connect with local employers and leaders in aviation from the moment they start training.”

Roy Clemens was born in Moose Jaw, Sask., on March 14, 1918. He studied aeronautics and served as a pilot and technical officer in the RCAF in England during WWII. In 1967, Clemens moved from Vancouver to Kelowna to set up and run Western Star manufacturing plant. It was here he rekindled his interest in flying, soon getting his pilot’s license and building his own plane. 

Clemens coordinated Air Search and Rescue in the region for 35 years, retiring from that volunteer position at the age of 87. He was a founding member of the Kelowna Flying Club and the Kelowna branch of the Experimental Aircraft Association, and provided technical advice to aircraft builders all over the world. Clemens passed away in 2013.

“Dad's greatest passion in life was flying—from his first flight in a crop duster at age eight, right up until the end of his life at age 95,” says his daughter, Patricia Campbell. “He inspired so many people to pursue flying—either as a career or as a hobby—and I know he would be pleased that this memorial award will continue helping others to achieve their airborne dreams.”

Born in Edmonton on April 13, 1914, Margaret Fane Rutledge’s life-long interest in aviation was sparked in early childhood. Rutledge was the first woman west of Toronto to earn a commercial pilot’s license. She overcame frequent discrimination in pursuit of her dream of being a commercial pilot, as many airlines refused to hire women for the role. 

"Aunt Margaret never saw herself as being special because she was a female pilot...she was special because she was a pilot,” says Rutledge’s nephew, Graham Fane. 

Rutledge persevered and ultimately piloted several flights for a Canadian airline, worked with a bush pilot outfit in northern B.C. She worked with Grant McConachie and Canadian Airlines, and also founded the "Flying Seven" - an elite group of Canadian female pilots associated with Amelia Earhart, based out of Vancouver. Rutledge passed away in 2004 at the age of 90.

“She wasn't just a pilot. She was a role model for following your dreams,” says Fane.

Both the Roy Clemens and Margaret Fane Rutledge Award will each be awarded annually to a student who has completed the first year of full-time study in the program. For more information about awards eligibility, please contact Okanagan College’s Financial Aid office at financialaid@okanagan.bc.ca

The Commercial Aviation diploma program is for men and women who are interested in pursuing a career in aviation. The two-year program provides participants with business experience along with the aviation training required by Transport Canada to ensure they are prepared to enter into the field of commercial aviation.

For information on the program, additional details on participant eligibility or to apply, contact Marc Vanderaegen at marc@flysifc.ca.
Let’s raise a glass (of water) to our water engineering technologists
Okanagan College Media Release

Turning on the tap this morning to brush your teeth, you probably didn’t think twice about the process of how that clean, fresh waterOC WET Grads Feb 2015 made its way into the comfort of your home. Who are those that we trust so immensely with the job of ensuring our water is controlled, treated, monitored, and ultimately safe?

Engineering Week (March 1 to 7) might just be the time to give thought to the vital and universal role of the water engineering technologists we depend on.

“We all want to drink water from the tap that is safe, and likewise to ensure our waste is taken care of properly,” says Professor Eric Jackson, Chair of Okanagan College’s Water Engineering Technology (WET) program. “Our graduates are the water quality monitoring technologists, environmental engineering technologists, and water and wastewater treatment plant operators who work diligently behind the scenes in our communities to ensure public health is protected when it comes to water and wastewater.”

Water treatment is a complex field that is rapidly evolving to constantly improve procedures and to protect the environment.  Engineering technologists monitor the various steps of water management and conduct preventative maintenance.  For the job, candidates need to have a strong foundational knowledge in biology, chemistry, technology, and have good analytical skills. As with all engineers, it’s about the desire to know how something works, and making it work. 

Nicole Moggey graduated from the College’s WET program 10 years ago. Since then she has worked with the City of Kelowna at the Wastewater Treatment Facility and manages the laboratory. 

“Each day I get to come to work in an advanced facility that is cutting edge from a design, technology and science perspective,” notes Moggey. “When I first graduated, I felt prepared to jump right in and put my skills to work. Now, I see new graduates joining our team who are knowledgeable about the latest technologies and methods. That speaks volumes about the quality of education the program provides and how it evolves to keep pace with the innovation we see in the field.”

Helping treat up to 45 million litres a day of wastewater from Kelowna, a total of seven College WET graduates work at the Kelowna Wastewater Treatment Facility.  An additional four graduates work to ensure that the City Water Utility provides safe drinking water.

The two-year WET program at the College offers students hands-on learning that includes traditional chemical and civil engineering technology combined with innovative water-focused environmental studies. The curriculum of the Water and Wastewater Technology specialty of the diploma focuses on domestic water treatment, municipal and industrial wastewater treatment, hydraulics, and industrial computer control.

For each hour of lecture, students have one hour of practical lab skills time. There is the appeal of small class sizes (an intake of 40 students per year) that allows students increased time with the instructors to train for a successful career, many of which are municipal positions offering pensions and job-security. 

“Training is a big expense for employers,” explains Jackson. “The combination of instruction by industry experts, the applied learning model, and co-op job placements mean our graduates are well-equipped to jump right into a job upon completing the program. In fact, most seamlessly transition into a permanent job with their co-op employer.”
Engineering technologists plug in to the business of IT
Okanagan College Media Release 

Troy Berg Feb 2015Information Technology (IT) managers increasingly have the ear of senior management and have a seat at the table when it comes to making strategic decisions to advance a company’s objectives. 

In today’s world, businesses operate on a need-for-speed model and it is the IT team’s responsibility to provide productive, timely, and most importantly connected business solutions. After all, nothing grinds business to a halt as much as Internet service interruptions or not being able to access working files on the network servers.

Kelowna resident Troy Berg graduated four years ago from Okanagan College’s Network and Telecommunications Engineering Technology (NTEN) program and currently works as IT Manager for the law firm of Doak Shirreff. “As an IT professional, I see myself as an advocate for and translator of technology to business managers,” he says. “IT can be confusing to those who are not familiar with it. We can use our knowledge to offer creative and proactive solutions on ways to improve productivity, workflow, security, and profitability. A huge part of my job is to make business cases for ways technology can help make businesses run faster and better, and get a calculable return on investment.”

The two-year NTEN diploma program at Okanagan College teaches students the intricacies of technology in three distinct areas of focus: network infrastructure, telecommunication, and client/server administration. Attuned to the business needs of the future, the program incorporates business management courses to help students understand the correlation between IT and business. 

“Certainly a passion for technology and a curiosity for finding out how things work is a must when entering this field of study,” says Phil Ashman, Associate Dean of Science, Technology and Health at Okanagan College. “More than simply being ‘techies’, our graduates are engineering technologists who apply their thorough understanding of the sophistication of IT in order to support businesses broadly across industries. They are employed as IT specialists for banks, natural resources companies, government and education institutions, and in Troy’s case a law firm.”

The diploma affords graduates the practical skills to become Computer System Analysts, Cloud and Data Centre Specialists, Network Administrators, Telecommunications Technicians, and IT Integrators and Consultants as examples. Since its launch, 136 students have graduated from the niche NTEN Diploma program. The BC Student Outcomes Survey results for the last five years found that 91 per cent of NTEN graduates are employed, many of which in a variety of organizations throughout the Okanagan.

“The convenience of technology is a part of our everyday life, and as such it’s easy to think we all know IT quite well. It’s the millennial factor,” explains Ron Light, Okanagan College Professor and Chair of the NTEN program. “What we see in our students in their first week of class is how surprised they are to discover the intricate back-end complexities of user technologies.”

As a rule, the easier the technology is for individuals to use, the more complex and bigger the team on the back-end to make it operate smoothly. It’s an unforgiving field of work with no margin of error: it either works or it doesn’t.

“I agree that this is indeed the age of the ‘Internet of Everything’,” says Light. “You cannot run a business today without having an efficient and secure computing infrastructure. From our smart phones and wireless devices that enable us to work remotely, to Voice over Internet Protocol (VOIP) and streaming video for conferencing, to fibre optic connectivity and cloud-based services., these are the tools of business today. The IT department is the architect, mechanic, and occasionally maybe even the magician, that makes it all happen.”

Engineering Week (March 1 to 7) celebrates the engineers and engineering technologists who make things work in our community. Visit www.okanagan.bc.ca/nten for more information about Okanagan College’s program.
A comedic curling match with the devil takes the stage in upcoming Red Dot Players production
Okanagan College Media Release

What could be more Canadian than W.O. Mitchell, a curling competition with the devil set in the Prairies and curling stones that can be used in any season?Red Dot Players Feb 2015

This is what you can expect on the stage March 5 to 8 as the Okanagan College Red Dot Players present Mitchell’s comedy The Black Bonspiel of Wullie MacCrimmon at the Kelowna campus. This will be the theatre company’s fifth production.

Based on the classic literary tale of Faust's deal with the devil, a curling match sets the stage for this humorous, clever and Canadianized version of the ultimate battle between good vs. evil. 

"One of the challenges with the script was to create an actual curling match on the stage," says the play’s director Mike Minions, Okanagan College's Educational Technology Coordinator. "Using the big lathe in the College's carpentry shop we built some wooden curling rocks on roller bearings. They painted up pretty well and the actors have been working hard to learn to make the shots they need to for each end of the game." 

The audience will be transported to the fictional town of Wildrose, Alberta in 1936 where protagonist Wullie, a shoe repairman, faces-off with the devil and his rink from Hell consisting of Judas Iscariot, Lucrezia Borgia, and none-other than the melancholic Macbeth in a curling match. The stakes are high: a win means Wullie will ultimately earn gold at the upcoming Brier Championship, but if he loses, he not only loses his immortal soul to the devil, but – even worse in his opinion— he will have to play on the devil’s team in the Celestial Brier, a curling match between Heaven and Hell. This two-act play delivers quirky characters, clever dialogue and takes a fond look at the obsession with curling so typical of a prairie town. 

“Each year I am truly impressed by the talent our extended College community brings to these plays,” says artistic director and Okanagan College English professor Jeremy Beaulne. “This year we have a cast of 10 and an additional five crew members who worked extremely hard these past few months to make this play come to life.”

Performances take place at the Kelowna campus theatre on March 5, 6, and 7 each at 7 p.m., with an additional matinee on Sunday, March 8 at 2 p.m.

Tickets are $15 and are available at the Okanagan College Campus Store, Mosaic Books, and at the door. 

The Red Dot Players is a theatre troupe for Okanagan College students, alumni, and employees based on the Kelowna campus. Previous productions include The Beaux' Stratagem (2011), Blithe Spirit (2012), Les Belles-Soeurs (2013), and The Government Inspector (2014). For more information, visit the Red Dot Players website at www.kalwriters.com/rdp
Okanagan College Students’ Union supports the future of trades
Okanagan College Media Release

OCSU Donation Feb 2015The profile of Okanagan College’s Kelowna campus along KLO Road will change significantly over the next year and the Okanagan College Students’ Union is showing support for the new complex that will elevate the region as a hub for trades training.

The OCSU has pledged $100,000 towards the Bright Horizons, Building for Skills fundraising campaign that supports the renovation and expansion of the trades training complex at Okanagan College.

“After supporting the Centre of Excellence at the Penticton Campus a few years ago, seeing how that building came together and the impact that it has had for students as a place to grow and succeed…that really inspired us to get behind this project,” says Chelsea Grisch, Executive Chairperson of the Okanagan College Students’ Union. 

“We are very proud and appreciative of the fact that our students have chosen to invest in the future of their college,” says Okanagan College President Jim Hamilton. “Their action demonstrates great leadership on their part and confirms our commitment to providing the best possible environment to support student learning.” 

“We think it’s a powerful message that Okanagan College students see the value of this new learning facility and want to step up and play an active role in building it,” adds Grisch. “We hope it will inspire others in the community to give to the campaign and support students.”

The College acknowledges the significance of its students stepping up to support not only their education, but the education of those students who will follow in their footsteps.  

“They are contributing to the students and the generations to come,” explains Hamilton. “That speaks very highly to their character, to the value they place on post-secondary education, and to the value they place on being a part of this community—both now and in the future.”

While the three-storey trades training complex will enhance the physical profile of the College along KLO Road, it was the College’s commitment to sustainability and reducing environmental footprint through an innovative design that motivated OCSU to support the project. The building is aiming to meet both the Living Building Challenge and LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Platinum objectives.

“When the opportunity arose for us to play a part in supporting the rejuvenation of the trades training complex here in Kelowna, we wanted to show in a bold way just how important we feel it is for students to have a learning environment that is ahead of the curve, vibrant, and that reflects Okanagan College’s commitment to sustainability,” explains Grisch.

“The community should take note,” says Alf Kempf, President of the Okanagan College Foundation. “To have our students step forward like this and say ‘we want to help make the College an even better place…we want to help build a space that benefits not just our class but all the students that follow us’, that says a lot about our students and the connection they feel to the College.”

Construction of the new complex at BC’s second largest trades training institution is expected to be completed in spring of 2016. 

The $7-million Bright Horizons, Building for Skills fundraising campaign for project launched in October 2014. The campaign’s efforts will supplement the provincial government’s commitment of $28 million to the renovation project. In addition to capital, the Okanagan College Foundation is accepting donations of equipment, tools, and other support to help enhance programs and opportunities for students.

To learn more about the campaign and opportunities to get involved, please visit www.okanagan.bc.ca/campaign.

Okanagan College’s Dr. Barry McGillivray has decided to reinvest in the economy of the region that has treated him well
Okanagan College Media Release

Dr. Barry McGillivray, Associate Dean of the College’s School of Business, is donating $100,000 to develop a research centre at the College Barry McGillivray Feb 2015that will be focused on small business and entrepreneurship in the Southern Interior.

“I’m giving back to a region that has been very good to me,” says McGillivray. “Supporting research to benefit small businesses and entrepreneurs is one of the most effective avenues of building our region’s economy.”

A portion of the funds, invested with the Okanagan College Foundation, will be directed toward scholarships and bursaries for students as well. 

“I have a great and abiding faith in the quality of our students,” says McGillivray, pointing to a long list of student accomplishments in national and international case competitions and to a growing number of notable alumni from the College’s Business Administration degree and diploma programs.

“Research will round out the School of Business’s profile – regionally and nationally,” says McGillivray. “We have a well-deserved reputation for teaching excellence, and for meeting student and employer needs and expectations. We also have a cadre of professors who are undertaking research important to our region; research that focuses on small- and medium-sized enterprises, on the wine industry, on agriculture and on tourism.

“My intent is that the Centre for Small Business and Entrepreneurship Research will serve as an incubator for some of our newer faculty to do more applied research, especially with regard to the barriers that entrepreneurs face.”

McGillivray is also hoping that his contribution will spur others to support the Centre.

“Barry’s commitment to this region and to our institution is remarkable,” says Okanagan College President Jim Hamilton. “I know he thought carefully about what he could do to help the communities we serve, consulted many people and struck upon developing this Centre as the best investment he could make. I applaud him for his generosity and his foresight.”

“Barry’s donation is also evidence of the support being shown for the College by the very people who make this place what it is,” notes Okanagan College Foundation Executive Director Kathy Butler. “It is encouraging to see students, staff and instructors choose to contribute to enhancing the College and supporting students.”