Programs and Courses

The Interdiciplinary Department offers courses in Inidigenous Studies, Criminology, Women's Studies and Social Work.

Indigenous Studies Courses

INDG 100-3-3
Introduction to Indigenous Studies

This course introduces students to historical events, concepts, and interactions critical to understanding Indigenous peoples worldwide. Students will develop critical skills in comparative analysis and synthesis and examine the merits of cross-cultural understanding and cultural and national diversity. Students with credit for ABST 100 cannot take this course for further credit. (3,0,0)


INDG 201-3-3
Okanagan Indigenous Peoples' History

This course introduces the Okanagan oral system of recording events and shows how history is one facet of the oral system. Okanagan historical stories, testimonies, and practices are examined with reference to the sources, methodologies, and perspectives of the disciplines of history and anthropology. (3,0,0)

Prerequisites:

  • second-year standing


INDG 202-3-3
Okanagan Concepts and Frameworks

This course provides an overview of significant Okanagan peoples' concepts and social institutions and their application in traditional and contemporary Okanagan life. Dynamic Okanagan evolutionary and systemic concepts reveal an experiential, or practiced, understanding of complex ecological, systemic, spiritual, and psychological relationships between the Okanagan people and the world. (3,0,0)

Sustainability-Focused Course: concentrated or themed on social, economic and environmental sustainability.

Prerequisites:

  • second-year standing


INDG 203-3-3
Indigenous Historical Perspectives

This course examines Indigenous societies as they existed in pre-contact times and continued on their own terms, seizing the opportunities of the fur trade and other industries, anticipating and responding to government policies, and fashioning a resurgence of identity and political activity. The oral system of historical documentation, Indigenous stories, testimonies, and other evidence, are critically examined with reference to the sources and methodologies of the disciplines of history and anthropology. (3,0,0)

Prerequisites:

  • second-year standing


INDG 204-3-3
Indigenous Concepts and Frameworks

This course provides an overview of significant Indigenous concepts and social institutions and their application in traditional and contemporary Indigenous community life. Oral traditions and histories are used to provide the conceptual and metaphorical frameworks of understanding with regard to kinship, economics, spiritual relationships and ways of knowing. (3,0,0)

Sustainability-Focused Course: concentrated or themed on social, economic and environmental sustainability.

Prerequisites:

  • second-year standing

Criminology Courses

CRIM 111-3-3
Introduction to Criminology

This course will examine different terms and concepts commonly used in criminology, such as crime, delinquency, deviance, criminal, victim, rehabilitation and treatment, criminology as a body of knowledge and as a profession, and the position and subject matter of criminology. The relationship between criminology and other disciplines will be studied. (3,0,0)


CRIM 121-3-3
Introduction to the Criminal Justice System

This course is an introductory analysis of the structure and operation of the Canadian criminal justice system. Examinations of the pattern of crime and victimization; police operations, discretion and decision making; the criminal courts, including sentencing; the corrections systems, including correctional institutions and community-based models are included. (3,0,0)


CRIM 203-3-3
Psychological Perspectives on Crime and Deviance

In this course students will be introduced to psychological theories of criminal and deviant behaviour. Biological, psychiatric, and psychosocial explanations of crimes and deviance will be covered. (3,0,0)

Prerequisites:

  • PSYC 111

  • PSYC 121


CRIM 204-3-3
Women, Crime and Justice

In this course we will examine the history of women and crime and consider crime as a constructed discourse with particular gendered implications. We will examine how the Canadian criminal justice system and social control apparatus constructs women as criminals, victims and workers and how this in turn reflects and reproduces our stratified social order. This course is also offered as WMST 204 and SOCI 204. Students with credit for WMST 204 or SOCI 204 cannot take CRIM 204 for further credit. (3,0,0)

Prerequisites:

  • CRIM 111 or SOCI 111 or WMST 100


CRIM 210-3-3
Law, Youth and Young Offenders

This course involves an analysis of the definition and control of youthful misconduct in a historical and contemporary context. Topics focus on changes in the concepts of juvenile delinquency and the young offender as related to legislation, public perceptions and media representations of youth crime, theories of youth crime and delinquency, and programs and services established to deal with young offenders. (3,0,0)

Prerequisites:

  • CRIM 111

  • CRIM 121


CRIM 220-3-3
The Politics of Human Rights

This course introduces students to the issues of human rights with respect to international, regional and national politics, and legal conventions. It will study the origins of the current human rights regime; the transformations and extensions of human rights into the second-and third-generation rights; the institutionalization of human rights in the global arena and the limitations of the international treaty system. The last section of the course examines several distinct human rights issues such as torture, genocide, humanitarian intervention, and punitive and restorative justice. This course is also offered as POLI 220. Students with credit for CRIM 220 cannot take POLI 220 for further credit. (0,0,0)

Prerequisites:

  • POLI 101 or second-year standing


CRIM 230-3-3
Criminal Law

This course involves an examination of the nature, sources, and basic principles of criminal law. The distinctions between mens rea and actus reus, between regulatory offences and real crimes, and between strict and absolute liability are the focus of the course. Modes of participation in crime, the range of legal defenses, and the impact of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms will also be examined. (3,0,0)

Prerequisites:

  • CRIM 235


CRIM 235-3-3
Canadian Law and Legal Institutions

Formerly CRIM 135

This course is an introduction to the foundation and operation of basic legal institutions in Canada. Students will explore common and civil law, the historical, political, economic and social contexts within which legal institutions operate, and the fundamentals of law creation and interpretation. (3,0,0)

Prerequisites:

  • CRIM 111

  • CRIM 121


CRIM 240-3-3
Applied Ethics for Criminal and Social Justice Professions

This course examines ethical issues confronting professionals in the criminal and associated justice systems. Topics focus on the philosophy of morals and ethics, professional ethical codes and restraints on professional conduct, ethics of decision-making, conflicts between the professional's duty to protect society and his/her duty to the client, concerns regarding privileged communications and confidentiality. (3,0,0)

Prerequisites:

  • CRIM 111

  • CRIM 121


CRIM 260-3-3
Social Science Research Methods

This course introduces students to common research techniques that are used in the social sciences. Topics include quantitative and qualitative research design, data collection, sampling procedures, interpretation and analysis of data, ethics, and report writing. The perspective is an inter-disciplinary approach to research methodologies. (3,0,0)

Prerequisites:

  • 6 credits of PSYC and/or SOCI

Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies Courses

GSWS 100-3-3
Introduction to Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies 

Formerly offered as WMST 100. Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies is interdisciplinary, devoted to the study of gendered identities and representation. This course provides an introduction to intersectional feminist scholarship and debates, with a particular focus on understanding gender and feminism in Canada. Topics of study include women's studies and feminist activism and alliances, masculinity studies, and sexualities. Students with credit for WMST 100 cannot take GSWS 100 for further credit. (3,0,0) 


GSWS 202-3-3
Women and Politics 

Formerly offered as WMST 202. This course provides a critical examination of women as political actors in contemporary societies. Using gender as a unit of analysis, the course will study changing societal and political roles of women, traditional and non-traditional ways of participation of women in politics, and impact of women's movements in defining the political agenda from various theoretical perspectives. This course is also offered as POLI 202. Students with credit for WMST 202 or POLI 202 cannot take GSWS 202 for further credit. (3,0,0) 

Prerequisites:

  • GSWS 100
    or POLI 101
    or WMST 100 or second-year standing


GSWS 204-3-3
Women, Crime and Social Justice 

Formerly offered as WMST 204. In this course we will examine the history of women and crime and consider crime as a constructed discourse with particular gendered implications. We will examine how the Canadian criminal justice system and social control apparatus constructs women as criminals, victims and workers and how this in turn reflects and reproduces our stratified social order. This course is also offered as CRIM 204 and SOCI 204. Students with credit for WMST 204 or CRIM 204 or SOCI 204 cannot take GSWS 204 for further credit. (3,0,0) 

Prerequisites:

  • WMST 100
    or GSWS 100
    or POLI 101
    or SOCI 111


GSWS 210-3-3
Women in Literature 

Formerly offered as WMST 210. Techniques of literary study, with emphasis on how women are represented in and have contributed to the literary tradition, will be combined with a selection of representative texts written by women. This course will examine the relationship of women's writing to the canon of English Literature in the context of some critical and literary works. This course is also offered as ENGL 210. Students with credit for WMST 210 or ENGL 210 cannot take GSWS 210 for further credit. (3,0,0) 

Prerequisites:

  • 6 credits from: ENGL 100, 150, 151, 153, 199 but not including both ENGL 100 and ENGL 199 


 

GSWS 211-3-3
Women and the Economy 

Formerly offered as WMST 211. This course focuses on economic issues of particular relevance to women. Topics discussed will include women's participation in the labour force, male-female education and income differences, discrimination, feminization of poverty, empowerment of women in developing countries, and women's role in home production and child-rearing. This course is also offered as ECON 210. Students with credit for WMST 211 or ECON 210 cannot take GSWS 211 for further credit. (3,0,0) 

Prerequisites:

  • second-year standing



GSWS 213-3-3
Women in Crosscultural Perspective 

Formerly offered as WMST 213. This course includes an exploration of topics from anthropology focusing on explanations, in current and historical perspective, for variations in the situation of women. This course is also offered as ANTH 213. Students with credit for WMST 213 or ANTH 213 cannot take GSWS 213 for further credit. (3,0,0) 

Prerequisites:

  • WMST 100
    or GSWS 100
    or ANTH 121



GSWS 215-3-3
Women and Popular Cultural 

Formerly offered as WMST 215. This course examines how women are represented in a variety of genres in popular culture (for example, television, advertising, music, fiction, film and the Internet). Students will engage in an analysis of the historical, social and cultural contexts which influence the representation of women in popular culture. The social and personal implications of these representations will be explored as well as the extent to which these media can be used to provoke social and personal change. Students with credit for WMST 215 cannot take GSWS 215 for further credit. (3,0,0) 

 


GSWS 216-3-3
Feminism and Film 

Formerly offered as WMST 216. This course will explore theoretical and practical points of contact between feminism and film. It will examine various feminist approaches to the study and production of film including, but not limited to, psychoanalysis, narrative and ideological analysis as well as semiotic, material or cultural studies. Students will learn how to read film, currently one of our most powerful cultural technologies. Students with credit for WMST 216 cannot take GSWS 216 for further credit. (3,0,0) 

Prerequisites:

  • WMST 100
    or GSWS 100

 


 

GSWS 222-3-3
Eco-Feminism 

Formerly offered as WMST 222. Eco-Feminism is based on the proposition that women and nature as configured by western philosophy are conceptually linked as feminine or female nature. This course will make visible the connections between the understanding of nature as feminine and global processes based on the control of people and resources for the sake of capital accumulation to the detriment of the natural world. Students with credit for WMST 222 cannot take GSWS 222 for further credit. (3,0,0) 

 


 

GSWS 225-3-3
Men and Masculinities 

Formerly offered as WMST 225. This course is a critical study of the multiple forms of oppression and privilege that are produced through interpretations, interactions and definitions of masculinity. Learners explore masculinities as maintained and reproduced on individual, cultural and institutional levels of society. Specific topics may vary but will include some of the following intersections with masculinity: sport, violence, religion and ethnicity, geography, health, crime and punishment, sexuality, education and social class. This course is also offered as SOCI 224. Students with credit for WMST 225 or GSWS 225 cannot take SOCI 224 for further credit. (3,0,0) 

Prerequisites:

  • WMST 100
    or GSWS 100
    or SOCI 111

 


 

GSWS 269-3-3
Studies in Sexualities

This course introduces to students to perspectives on sexualities, sexual practices and sexual identities. It explores historical and contemporary approaches to sexuality and how these intersect with gender, class, and racialization. The topics of study take into account how structural influences shape experiences and understandings of sexuality and how resistance has brought about social change. This course is also offered as SOCI 269. Students with credit for SOCI 269 cannot take GSWS 269 for further credit. (3,0,0)

Prerequisites:

  • SOCI 111
    or GSWS 100
    or WMST 100

 


 

GSWS 295-3-3
Current Topics In Women’s Studies 

This course is an examination of selected topics in women's studies including, but not limited to, history, labour, feminist theory, race and ethnicity. Consult with the department for current offerings. With different topics, this course may be taken more than once for credit. (3,0,0) 

Prerequisites:

  • WMST 100
    or GSWS 100
  • permission of the department

 

Social Work Courses

SOCW 200A-3-3
An Introduction to Social Work Practice

An introduction to the general practice of social work with emphasis in interdisciplinary approaches and the roles of consumer and self-help groups in the helping process. This course reviews the knowledge base and skills of social work practice, and assists students to evaluate their interests and capacities for entering the profession of social work. (3,0,0)

Also offered by Distance Education



SOCW 200B-3-3
An Introduction to Social Welfare in Canada

An introduction to and analysis of major social policies and programs in Canada. Emphasis will be given to policies on income security, corrections, health, family and children, and housing, and will include an examination of the role of the social worker in formulating policy. (3,0,0)

Also offered by Distance Education