News

Previous Posts(0)
Archive(353)
May 2018 (4)
April 2018 (9)
March 2018 (12)
February 2018 (6)
January 2018 (5)
December 2017 (9)
November 2017 (10)
October 2017 (6)
September 2017 (13)
August 2017 (6)
July 2017 (6)
June 2017 (11)
May 2017 (12)
April 2017 (6)
March 2017 (12)
February 2017 (15)
January 2017 (12)
December 2016 (9)
November 2016 (9)
October 2016 (10)
September 2016 (6)
August 2016 (11)
July 2016 (5)
June 2016 (8)
May 2016 (12)
April 2016 (7)
March 2016 (19)
February 2016 (14)
January 2016 (14)
December 2015 (10)
November 2015 (11)
October 2015 (11)
September 2015 (20)
August 2015 (4)
July 2015 (6)
June 2015 (13)
Blog Topics(0)
Records 1 to 4 of 5
New Chair, Vice Chair for OC Board
Okanagan College Media Release

Okanagan College has a new Chair and Vice Chair for its Board of Governors.

Christopher Derickson Sept 2014Chris Derickson, a councillor with the Westbank First Nation and a four-year veteran of the Board, was elected Tuesday as chair. Gloria Morgan, a former chief of the Splatsin Indian Band and an Enderby resident, was acclaimed as vice chair at the Board’s November meeting.

Derickson replaces Summerland’s Connie Denesiuk, whose six-year term with the Board ends in July.

Morgan steps into the role vacated by Derickson.

“Education has been and will be a key determinant for our region’s social and economic health, and I’m honoured to have the opportunity to contribute in this role,” says Derickson. “Okanagan College is a vital part of the economic and cultural landscape and I’m focused on ensuring it continues to develop its reputation and contributions.”
Gloria Morgan Aug 2016
Derickson is a partner in Alderhill Planning Inc., which works with government and First Nations communities developing community plans, community engagement strategies, strategic plans and legal research services. He has served on the Westbank First Nation Council since 2012.

Morgan
was a Chief of the Splatsin Indian Band from 2001 to 2005 and has been an RCMP officer, a general practice lawyer as well as a Crown Prosecutor. She was the President of the Enderby and District Chamber of Commerce, and member of the RCMP's E Division Aboriginal Advisory Committee, and served on the board of the Provincial Community Co-ordination for Women's Safety.

“Okanagan College has much to offer in terms of providing the educational opportunities that can serve all people, employers, marginalized groups, and all our communities. I’ve seen its strengths and capacity in the short time I have been on the Board and I want to see that grow further.”

Morgan has been on the Board of Governors since 2016.

She was recently appointed to the BC Patient Safety and Quality Council and served on the BC Patient Care and Quality Review Board. She was the recipient of the Community Leader Awards - Community Builder award 2016, North Okanagan.

 


Renowned human rights activist to give free public talk at Okanagan College
Okanagan College Media Release

For more than 30 years, Rick Sauvé has dedicated his life to improving the recognition of prisoners as rights-bearing citizens – a life’s mission he stumbled upon while serving 17 years in prison for murder.Rick Sauve Jan 2018

Sauvé is a former inmate turned internationally recognized human rights activist and will be coming to Okanagan College campuses in Kelowna and Vernon to share his compelling story in a series of upcoming free presentations.

During his time in prison, Sauvé quickly found out that as an inmate he was unable to vote. He turned to academics in hopes of becoming more knowledgeable on human rights and prisoner issues and went on to achieve a high school standing and two degrees in criminology and psychology.

While imprisoned, Sauvé successfully challenged the Supreme Court of Canada on an inmate’s right to vote, arguing that prisoners still remain citizens in a democratic society and thereby have the right to vote.

Sauvé’s ground-breaking activist work over the past decades led him to receive the 2017 Ed McIsaac Human Rights in Corrections Award in Ottawa last December. He is the ninth person to receive the award.

Sauvé will present at the Kelowna campus on Feb. 5 at 7 p.m. in the Lecture Theatre and again at the Vernon campus on Feb. 6 at 7 p.m. in the Lecture Theatre. The public is invited to attend this free event and parking is complimentary. 

 


Indigenous carving course takes shape at Okanagan College
Okanagan College Media Release

An internationally renowned master carver and Indigenous artist is setting up shop at Okanagan College this winter to pass on the traditional skills and knowledge he has honed over a 25-year career working with wood.

Darren McKenzie Jan 2018Darren McKenzie is a Cree and Métis artist from Vancouver. Fueled by a desire to inspire the next generation of carvers, he recently worked with the College to develop a new course – Indigenous Wood Sculpting – that will run from Feb. 2-18, and again from March 2-18, at the Kelowna campus.

“This course is a bit of a hybrid,” explains McKenzie, who began his career as an illustrator and painter before turning to carving in the early 1990s. “It will be a blend of traditional carving and Indigenous wood carving, but it’s going to be very open-ended. We’ll delve into any techniques and styles the students want to learn.”

The course will also cater to students of all skill levels.

“There will be something for everyone,” says McKenzie. “We’ll work through everything from basic drawing, design and carving, to some more advanced elements.”

McKenzie began carving in 1993 under the instruction of Salish Artist Gerry Sheena. He then went on to complete an intensive four-year apprenticeship with master carver Ken Mowatt at the ‘Ksan Historical Village and Museum in Hazelton, B.C.
Darren McKenzie carving Jan 2018

His work has been displayed extensively at museums and galleries across North America over the past three decades, from the Museum of Arts and Design in New York to a solo exhibition at the Art Gallery of Regina to the Douglas Reynolds in Vancouver.

Throughout that time, McKenzie has remained committed to sharing what he has learned along the way with budding artists. He hopes this course might encourage new carvers to pick up the tools of his trade.

“I’m always excited to hang out with like-minded people and pass on my knowledge,” says McKenzie. “I hope everyone comes away inspired to keep on learning and keep on carving.”

The course runs Friday evenings and weekends. More information is available at okanagan.bc.ca/indigenouscarving

 


Water Engineering grad on road to success after College experience
Okanagan College Media Release

Brian Bjorkland Jan 2018With big goals to be part of the solution for a brighter environmental future in British Columbia, Brian Bjorkland enrolled in Okanagan College’s Water Engineering Technology program and is now among 427 students receiving their credentials at the College’s first convocation ceremony of 2018.

Saturday’s graduation ceremony will see Bjorkland receive a diploma in front of family and friends, but it won’t be the first time he has crossed the stage. After earning a Bachelor’s degree in Environmental Biology in 2013 from Thompson Rivers University, Bjorkland knew he would have more career options if he specialized in his field.

“I knew I had to get another credential on top of my degree to give myself the best chance of standing out from the masses and getting a good job,” says Bjorkland. “I chose to enrol in the Water Engineering Tech program because of the program’s history and reputation and most importantly because it had a co-op component.”

Bjorkland was hired in his first year as a co-op student at the City of Surrey and was responsible for monitoring, completing maintenance and responding to alarms for the various pumping stations throughout the city. He was the first OC student to work for the City of Surrey and was invited back to complete his second co-op term with the same employer.

“The experience and skills I got with the City of Surrey was invaluable – it was really a unique job and actually helped me choose the environmental monitoring focus in my second year,” explains Bjorkland. “I was obviously expecting to enjoy that focus area because I chose it, but I wasn’t expecting to uncover a new passion for the biology of insects and plants in fresh water.”

The two-and-a-half-year program offers two streams of specialization for second-year students, water and wastewater technology and environmental monitoring – both of which see students spend more time wading in a creek than in a classroom chair.

“I loved that the classes in this program were so interesting and interactive,” says Bjorkland. “The instructors were great, it was an awesome learning environment and my fellow students were all really good people and I’ve made some friendships for life.”

Winter convocation is the first of the College’s eight ceremonies that take place this year. Students from all four campuses will cross the stage at the Kelowna campus to receive their credentials. The College will confer 79 Bachelor’s degrees, 11 Associate degrees, 231 diplomas and 106 certificates.

The morning ceremony will begin at 10 a.m. and the afternoon ceremony at noon. Both ceremonies will stream live on the College’s Facebook page: facebook.com/okanagancollege.ca.

 


Winner declared in Okanagan College 3-Hour Short Story contest
Okanagan College Media Release

More than 30 budding writers from across the valley put their writing skills to the test in Okanagan College’s 8th Annual 3-Hour Short Story contest and second-year arts student Hannah Stanley has been announced as the overall winner for her original story “The Best Years of Our Lives.”Hannah Stanley Dec 2017

The 180-minute timed contest was held last month at the College’s Vernon, Salmon Arm and Penticton campuses and at Kelowna Secondary School. The contest was open to Grade 11, 12 and College students who competed for four regional prizes of $250 in tuition credit. From the regional winners, an overall winner was selected to win an additional $500 credit and have their story published in a limited fine-print edition by Kalamalka Press.

“I woke up in the morning feeling very uninspired and I went into the contest without any prior story ideas or anything worked out in my head in advance,” says Stanley. “It actually wasn’t until the clock started and I heard the mystery phrase that I found inspiration and knew what I was going to write about.”

The contest challenges authors to integrate a mystery phrase, revealed at the start of the competition, into their stories. This year’s phrase, “frozen fish sticks,” immediately gave Stanley an image from her childhood of eating fish sticks and ketchup straight off the table, without a plate.

Her winning story is loosely based on her childhood experiences and is told from a child’s perspective about what life was like one year when, unknown to Stanley, her mother was experiencing depression.

“The goal of the story is to kind of take away the stigma of parents with a mental illness like depression who are worried they’re not a good enough parent or are somehow ruining their children’s lives,” explains Stanley. “The child doesn’t notice anything wrong with her mother and actually finds it to be one of the best years of her childhood because she gets to eat unlimited freezies, has tons of sleepovers and finds eating without plates or cutlery incredibly fun.”

Stanley’s story was one of many captivating narratives from the contest which drew out a diverse group of authors aged 16 to 43.

“We saw a large age span this year from previous years which added a lot of interest and made the competition pretty close – it was tough to choose just one overall winner,” says Dr. Sean Johnson, contest organizer and English professor at the College. “There is almost a 30-year age difference between the regional winners which just goes to show the uniqueness of this competition, that regardless of age anyone can win.”

Darby McEachern-Corley was declared the Salmon Arm regional winner for “The Eyes Never Lie,” Dawn Naas’s “Un-Fragmenting Thoughts” was selected as the Vernon regional winner and Parker Arcand took home the Penticton regional award for “Hearts of Metal and Ice.”

This year’s winning stories can be read online at www.okanagan.bc.ca/3hourwriting